Long-term prognostic significance and electrophysiological evolution of intraventricular conduction disturbances complicating acute myocardial infarction

F. Pagnoni, A. Finzi, R. Valentini, F. Ambrosini, A. Lotto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Fifty-nine patients with post-infarctional, isolated intraventricular conduction disturbances (IVCD) who survived the acute stage of myocardial infarction were followed up after hospital discharge for a mean period of 11.4 ± 4.8 months. Fourteen patients (24%) had HV interval prolongation (>55 ms) during AMI (group A), and 45 patients had normal HV intervals (76%, group B). His bundle recordings were repeated during follow-up in 48 survivors after a mean period of 7.2 ± 0.7 months. Infranodal conduction delay in the acute stage of infarction was correlated with a higher incidence of heart failure during AMI (78% of patients in group A vs 22% in group B, p5ms) in HV interval could be demonstrated in comparison to the acute phase recording, neither in patients with prolonged nor in patients with normal HV time. We conclude that HV prolongation in patients with isolated, post-infarctional IVCD is correlated with a worse prognosis, both during acute infarction and during the follow-up period, which presumably reflects wider anatomic damage in comparison to patients with normal HV time. The low incidence of late AV block and the electrophysiological demonstration of the stability of infranodal conduction several months after AMI indicate that these patients do not require permanent prophylactic pacing after acute myocardial infarction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-100
Number of pages10
JournalPACE - Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology
Volume9
Issue number1 I
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1986

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Long-term prognostic significance and electrophysiological evolution of intraventricular conduction disturbances complicating acute myocardial infarction'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this