Long-term results of preoperative 5-fluorouracil-oxaliplatin chemoradiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

Elisa Fontana, Francesca Pucci, Roberta Camisa, Simona Bui, Salvatore Galdy, Francesco Leonardi, Francesca Virginia Negri, Elisa Anselmi, Pier Luigi Losardo, Luigi Roncoroni, Paolo Dell'Abate, Pellegrino Crafa, Stefano Cascinu, Andrea Ardizzoni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim: To evaluate the activity, safety and long-term survival of patients after preoperative oxaliplatin and 5- fluorouracil chemoradiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Patients and Methods: Patients with resectable, T3-4 and/or nodal involvement rectal adenocarcinoma were treated with oxaliplatin 60 mg/m2 weekly and 5-fluorouracil 200 mg/m 2/d infused continuously for five days, over a period of five weeks, and radiotherapy (45 Gy/25 fractions). The primary end-point was pathological complete response (ypCR). Safety, overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) were secondary end-points. Results: Sixty-six patients were treated. Grade 1-2 diarrhea was the most common adverse event. The ypCR rate was 16.7% (95% confidence interval=7.7-25.7%). After a median follow-up of 73.5 months, 23 patients (34.8%) had experienced relapse. Five-year actuarial RFS and OS rates were 64% and 73%, respectively. Five-year actuarial RFS was 91.7% in the ypCR group versus 57.8% in non-ypCR cases. Conclusion: Long-term local control and survival after this very well-tolerated regimen appear encouraging.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)725-730
Number of pages6
JournalAnticancer Research
Volume33
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2013

Keywords

  • Chemoradiation
  • Colorectal adenocarcinoma
  • Combined treatment
  • Long-term outcome.
  • Neoadjuvant therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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