Long-term survivorship and complication rate comparison of a cementless modular stem and cementless fixed neck stems for primary total hip replacement

David A. Fitch, Cristina Ancarani, Barbara Bordini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Modular necks used in total hip replacement (THR) have become an increasingly discussed topic with the recent recall of multiple modular systems, but it is anticipated that outcomes for these devices are highly design-specific. The objectives of this study were to determine if the survivorship and complication rates of a specific modular femoral stem (PROFEMUR® Z, MicroPort Orthopedics Inc., Arlington, TN, USA) were significantly lower than those of all cementless fixed neck stems in an arthroplasty registry. Methods: The database of an arthroplasty registry was searched for all patients implanted with a specific modular stem and all those implanted with cementless fixed neck stems. Kaplan-Meier survivorship and complication rates were compared between the two groups. Results: The 12-year survivorship of the modular stem (95.8 %) was not significantly less than that of all cementless fixed neck stems (96.1 %). There was also no difference in revision rates for dislocation, periprosthetic fractures, aseptic loosening or septic loosening between the two groups. Conclusions: The use of the specific modular stem did not adversely affect long-term component survivorship or complication rates when compared to all cementless fixed neck THRs in an arthroplasty registry.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1827-1832
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Orthopaedics
Volume39
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 9 2015

Keywords

  • Exchangeable necks
  • Modular necks
  • Total hip arthroplasty
  • Total hip replacement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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