Long‐Term pH and Manometric Evaluation of the Distal Esophagus After Endoscopic Sclerotherapy of Esophageal Varices

Mario Costantini, Giovanni Zaninotto, Ermanno Ancona, Giorgio Battaglia, Antonietta Roveran, Domenico Scibetta, Antonino Cusumano, Alberto Peracchia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Endoscopic sclerotherapy (ES) of esophageal varices is widely used as an effective treatment for recurrent esophageal bleeding. Retrosternal pain, dysphagia, and esophageal strictures are frequently reported after ES. Alterations in esophageal motility have also been described. In this study, the motility pattern of the esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) competence were evaluated in a group of 11 patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices treated by means of ES. Esophageal manometry and pH monitoring of the distal esophagus were carried out before starting ES of esophageal varices, and 2 months and 6 months later. The results of the study demonstrated that ES does not affect LES competence or reduce the amplitude of esophageal motor contractions, but does induce esophageal motility changes consisting of a reduction of esophageal coordination, an increase in the percentage of contraction abnormalities (multipeaked contractions), an increase of the average contraction duration, and an alteration in LES relaxation after swallowing. These motor abnormalities are evident at both early and late control evaluations. However, since only few patients, in the authors' experience, develop esophageal symptoms after ES, these findings represent a minor side effect of the procedure, without clinical implications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)96-103
Number of pages8
JournalNeurogastroenterology and Motility
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1990

Fingerprint

Sclerotherapy
Esophageal and Gastric Varices
Esophagus
Lower Esophageal Sphincter
Mental Competency
Esophageal pH Monitoring
Esophageal Stenosis
Manometry
Portal Hypertension
Deglutition
Deglutition Disorders
Hemorrhage
Pain

Keywords

  • 24‐hour pH monitoring
  • endoscopic sclerotherapy
  • esophageal motility
  • esophageal varices

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Long‐Term pH and Manometric Evaluation of the Distal Esophagus After Endoscopic Sclerotherapy of Esophageal Varices. / Costantini, Mario; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Ancona, Ermanno; Battaglia, Giorgio; Roveran, Antonietta; Scibetta, Domenico; Cusumano, Antonino; Peracchia, Alberto.

In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Vol. 2, No. 2, 1990, p. 96-103.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Costantini, M, Zaninotto, G, Ancona, E, Battaglia, G, Roveran, A, Scibetta, D, Cusumano, A & Peracchia, A 1990, 'Long‐Term pH and Manometric Evaluation of the Distal Esophagus After Endoscopic Sclerotherapy of Esophageal Varices', Neurogastroenterology and Motility, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 96-103. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2982.1990.tb00014.x
Costantini, Mario ; Zaninotto, Giovanni ; Ancona, Ermanno ; Battaglia, Giorgio ; Roveran, Antonietta ; Scibetta, Domenico ; Cusumano, Antonino ; Peracchia, Alberto. / Long‐Term pH and Manometric Evaluation of the Distal Esophagus After Endoscopic Sclerotherapy of Esophageal Varices. In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility. 1990 ; Vol. 2, No. 2. pp. 96-103.
@article{d9d7eecfed904d12814f05bce000f71e,
title = "Long‐Term pH and Manometric Evaluation of the Distal Esophagus After Endoscopic Sclerotherapy of Esophageal Varices",
abstract = "Endoscopic sclerotherapy (ES) of esophageal varices is widely used as an effective treatment for recurrent esophageal bleeding. Retrosternal pain, dysphagia, and esophageal strictures are frequently reported after ES. Alterations in esophageal motility have also been described. In this study, the motility pattern of the esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) competence were evaluated in a group of 11 patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices treated by means of ES. Esophageal manometry and pH monitoring of the distal esophagus were carried out before starting ES of esophageal varices, and 2 months and 6 months later. The results of the study demonstrated that ES does not affect LES competence or reduce the amplitude of esophageal motor contractions, but does induce esophageal motility changes consisting of a reduction of esophageal coordination, an increase in the percentage of contraction abnormalities (multipeaked contractions), an increase of the average contraction duration, and an alteration in LES relaxation after swallowing. These motor abnormalities are evident at both early and late control evaluations. However, since only few patients, in the authors' experience, develop esophageal symptoms after ES, these findings represent a minor side effect of the procedure, without clinical implications.",
keywords = "24‐hour pH monitoring, endoscopic sclerotherapy, esophageal motility, esophageal varices",
author = "Mario Costantini and Giovanni Zaninotto and Ermanno Ancona and Giorgio Battaglia and Antonietta Roveran and Domenico Scibetta and Antonino Cusumano and Alberto Peracchia",
year = "1990",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-2982.1990.tb00014.x",
language = "English",
volume = "2",
pages = "96--103",
journal = "Neurogastroenterology and Motility",
issn = "1350-1925",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long‐Term pH and Manometric Evaluation of the Distal Esophagus After Endoscopic Sclerotherapy of Esophageal Varices

AU - Costantini, Mario

AU - Zaninotto, Giovanni

AU - Ancona, Ermanno

AU - Battaglia, Giorgio

AU - Roveran, Antonietta

AU - Scibetta, Domenico

AU - Cusumano, Antonino

AU - Peracchia, Alberto

PY - 1990

Y1 - 1990

N2 - Endoscopic sclerotherapy (ES) of esophageal varices is widely used as an effective treatment for recurrent esophageal bleeding. Retrosternal pain, dysphagia, and esophageal strictures are frequently reported after ES. Alterations in esophageal motility have also been described. In this study, the motility pattern of the esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) competence were evaluated in a group of 11 patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices treated by means of ES. Esophageal manometry and pH monitoring of the distal esophagus were carried out before starting ES of esophageal varices, and 2 months and 6 months later. The results of the study demonstrated that ES does not affect LES competence or reduce the amplitude of esophageal motor contractions, but does induce esophageal motility changes consisting of a reduction of esophageal coordination, an increase in the percentage of contraction abnormalities (multipeaked contractions), an increase of the average contraction duration, and an alteration in LES relaxation after swallowing. These motor abnormalities are evident at both early and late control evaluations. However, since only few patients, in the authors' experience, develop esophageal symptoms after ES, these findings represent a minor side effect of the procedure, without clinical implications.

AB - Endoscopic sclerotherapy (ES) of esophageal varices is widely used as an effective treatment for recurrent esophageal bleeding. Retrosternal pain, dysphagia, and esophageal strictures are frequently reported after ES. Alterations in esophageal motility have also been described. In this study, the motility pattern of the esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) competence were evaluated in a group of 11 patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices treated by means of ES. Esophageal manometry and pH monitoring of the distal esophagus were carried out before starting ES of esophageal varices, and 2 months and 6 months later. The results of the study demonstrated that ES does not affect LES competence or reduce the amplitude of esophageal motor contractions, but does induce esophageal motility changes consisting of a reduction of esophageal coordination, an increase in the percentage of contraction abnormalities (multipeaked contractions), an increase of the average contraction duration, and an alteration in LES relaxation after swallowing. These motor abnormalities are evident at both early and late control evaluations. However, since only few patients, in the authors' experience, develop esophageal symptoms after ES, these findings represent a minor side effect of the procedure, without clinical implications.

KW - 24‐hour pH monitoring

KW - endoscopic sclerotherapy

KW - esophageal motility

KW - esophageal varices

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84994912071&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84994912071&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-2982.1990.tb00014.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1365-2982.1990.tb00014.x

M3 - Article

VL - 2

SP - 96

EP - 103

JO - Neurogastroenterology and Motility

JF - Neurogastroenterology and Motility

SN - 1350-1925

IS - 2

ER -