Loss of tolerance to morphine after a change in route of administration: Control of within-session tolerance by interoceptive conditioned stimuli

Ronald F. Mucha, Harold Kalant, Niels Birbaumer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Tolerance to morphine analgesia (tail-immersion test) was examined after manipulation of two aspects of a tolerance test: 1) the route of drug administration and 2) the time interval between the test dosing and the tolerance test. The intravenous (IV) and intraperitoneal (IP) routes were used, together with a novel test for tolerance in which the test morphine was infused IV just 2 min before measuring the opiate effect. The first experiment validated this test as an assay for tolerance by examining the log dose-response (LDR) curve changes produced by daily IP injection with 0, 20 or 200 mg/kg morphine; the IV test confirmed the expected parallel shift to the right and flattening of the LDR curve. In the second experiment, all rats of two groups were injected once daily for 3 weeks with 20 mg/kg morphine and with saline except that one group received the morphine IV (and saline IP), the other morphine IP (saline IV). The results indicated route-specific tolerance. On a test using 20 mg/ kg given IV morphine, tolerance was significantly greater in rats treated with IV morphine than in those treated IP However, a larger effect on tolerance was produced by a pretest application of 5 mg/kg morphine 30 min before the actual tolerance test. This manipulation was designed to 'prime' short-term, adaptive processes hypothesized to occur within a normal tolerance test session as morphine is taking effect. The tolerance on the test increased (equivalent to 2 to 3 fold shift in the LDR curve) when the pretest morphine was given with the same route as the chronic morphine, regardless of treatment group. It was concluded that opiate tolerance may be modulated by conditioned stimuli produced by morphine acting through different routes. These interoceptive cues appear to modulate rapidly acquired and short-lived adaptive processes taking place within a given test session.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)365-372
Number of pages8
JournalPsychopharmacology
Volume124
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1996

Keywords

  • addiction
  • antino ciception
  • conditioning
  • drug cue
  • interoception
  • intravenous
  • opioid
  • routes
  • sensitization
  • tolerance
  • within-session

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

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