Low compliance of orthosis locomotion. Selection criteria based on energy expenditure

A. Veicsteinas, M. Ferrarin, G. Merati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Oxygen consumption (V̇O2), heart rate (HR) and cost of locomotion (C, energy required to cover 1 m per unit of transported mass) were measured in 14 paraplegics (age 19-59 yrs, BW 48-100 Kg, injury level C7-T11), during both wheelchair (Whch) and orthosis-assisted locomotion at 2-4 speeds, up to exhaustion (peak value, p). Subjects were divided into three groups; the HIP Guidance Orthosis Orlau Parawalker (PW, n=4), the Reciprocating Gait Orthosis (RGO, n=6) and the RGO with functional neuromuscular stimulation (RGO+FNS, n=4). Alms of the study were: a) to find out indicators of the poor long-term compliance (all but 2 RGO withdrawals in 5 yrs) on the basis of cost of locomotion and physical fitness; b) to assess selection criteria for the assignment of the different type of orthoses; c) to estimate whether electrical stimulation improves locomotion reducing fatigue. In RGO+FNS walking the slope difference of HR/V̇O2 curves between Whch and orthosis (ΔslHR/V̇O2) is significantly lower than in the other groups (=0 beats-l-1 for RGO+FNS vs 39 and 61 beats-I-1, for RGO and PW, respectively). Neither C, nor V̇O2P or ΔslHR/V̇O2 correlates with ortnosis length of use. C was higher (p2·m-1·Kg-1. It appears that: a) the poor long-term compliance for orthosis use depends on mechanisms (presumably psychological) apparently not related to fitness level; b) only those subjects who can deambulate at higher speeds might be suitable for electrical-stimulated types of orthosis. Hypothesis is made that adequate psychological and specific muscular training may improve compliance.

Original languageEnglish
JournalFASEB Journal
Volume12
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - Mar 20 1998

Fingerprint

Orthotic Devices
Locomotion
selection criteria
energy expenditure
compliance
Patient Selection
Energy Metabolism
locomotion
Wheelchairs
heart rate
Compliance
Hot isostatic pressing
physical fitness
Costs
gait
Fatigue of materials
walking
oxygen consumption
Oxygen
Heart Rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Low compliance of orthosis locomotion. Selection criteria based on energy expenditure. / Veicsteinas, A.; Ferrarin, M.; Merati, G.

In: FASEB Journal, Vol. 12, No. 5, 20.03.1998.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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