Low incidence of bleeding from HIV-related thrombocytopenia in drug addicts and hemophiliacs: Implications for therapeutic strategies

G. Finazzi, P. M. Mannucci, A. Lazzarin, A. Gringeri, C. Arici, D. Ciaci, R. Terzi, T. Barbui

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Abstract

The records of 608 intravenous drug addicts and 124 hemophiliacs diagnosed in 1985 to be seropositive for HIV were reviewed to identify patients with thrombocytopenia. The records of 54 drug addicts (8.9%) and 14 hemophiliacs (11.2%) who had chronic thrombocytopenia were then followed through June 1989 to estimate the incidence of bleeding episodes. The records of 55 HIV-seronegative patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), comparable for age, platelet count at diagnosis and duration of follow-up, were used for comparison. Patients with ITP were significantly different from those with HIV-associated thrombocytopenia in having a higher proportion of females (M/F ratio 13/42 v 53/15, p <0.001) and more intensive treatment (treated: 62% v 21%, p <0.001); splenectomized 37% v 1.5%, p <0.001). The incidence of major bleeding was not significantly different in drug addicts, hemophiliacs and ITP patients (0.98, 1.82 and 1.17/100 patients/year). Among drug addicts, bleeding was significantly more frequent in women than in men (3.4 v 0/100 patients/year, p <0.05). Our results indicate that the incidence of major bleeding in patients with HIV-associated thrombocytopenia is low and similar to that observed in more intensively treated ITP patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-85
Number of pages4
JournalEuropean Journal of Haematology
Volume45
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1990

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Drug Users
Thrombocytopenia
HIV
Hemorrhage
Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura
Incidence
Therapeutics
Platelet Count

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Low incidence of bleeding from HIV-related thrombocytopenia in drug addicts and hemophiliacs : Implications for therapeutic strategies. / Finazzi, G.; Mannucci, P. M.; Lazzarin, A.; Gringeri, A.; Arici, C.; Ciaci, D.; Terzi, R.; Barbui, T.

In: European Journal of Haematology, Vol. 45, No. 2, 1990, p. 82-85.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Finazzi, G. ; Mannucci, P. M. ; Lazzarin, A. ; Gringeri, A. ; Arici, C. ; Ciaci, D. ; Terzi, R. ; Barbui, T. / Low incidence of bleeding from HIV-related thrombocytopenia in drug addicts and hemophiliacs : Implications for therapeutic strategies. In: European Journal of Haematology. 1990 ; Vol. 45, No. 2. pp. 82-85.
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