Lower arterial cross-sectional area of carotid and vertebral arteries and higher frequency of secondary neck vessels are associated with multiple sclerosis

P. Belov, D. Jakimovski, J. Krawiecki, C. Magnano, J. Hagemeier, L.aura Pelizzari, B. Weinstock-Guttman, R. Zivadinov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background and Purpose: Arterial and neck vessel system characteristics of patients with multiple sclerosis have not been previously investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the frequency of neck vessels and their cross-sectional areas (in square millimeters) between patients with MS and healthy controls. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this study, 193 patients with MS and 193 age- A nd sex-matched healthy controls underwent 2D TOF venography at 3T. The main arterial (carotid and vertebral), venous (internal jugular), and secondary neck vessels were examined at 4 separate cervical levels (C2/3, C4, C5/6, and C7/T1). The ANCOVA adjusted for age, body mass index, smoking status, hypertension, and heart disease was used to compare the differences between patients with MS and healthy controls. RESULTS: After controlling for all confounding factors, patients with MS had significantly lower cross-sectional areas of the carotid arteries at the C2/3 (P = .03), C5/6 (P =.026), and C7/T1 (P = .005) levels as well as of the vertebral arteries at the C2/3 (P = .02), C4 (P = .012), and C7/T1 (P = .006) levels, compared with healthy controls. A higher frequency of secondary neck vessels was found at all 4 levels in patients with MS: C2/3 (12.9 versus 10, P<.001), C4 (9.1 versus 7.5, P<.001), C5/6 (7.8 versus 6.8, P=.012), and C7/T1 (8.8 versus 6, P<.001). The total cross-sectional areas of secondary neck vessels were also significantly higher at all 4 levels (P.03). No significant differences in the cross-sectional areas of jugular veins were found between patients with MS and healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with MS showed lower cross-sectional areas of the carotid and vertebral arteries and a higher frequency of secondary neck vessels and their cross-sectional areas compared with healthy controls.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-130
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

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