Lupus nephritis: low urinary DNase I levels reflect loss of renal DNase I and may be utilized as a biomarker of disease progression

Hege L Pedersen, Kjersti D Horvei, Dhivya Thiyagarajan, Gudrun E Norby, Natalya Seredkina, Gabriella Moroni, Gro Ø Eilertsen, Hallvard Holdaas, Erik H Strøm, Gunnstein Bakland, Pier-Luigi Meroni, Ole P Rekvig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Renal DNase I is lost in advanced stages of lupus nephritis. Here, we determined if loss of renal DNase I reflects a concurrent loss of urinary DNase I, and whether absence of urinary DNase I predicts disease progression. Mouse and human DNase I protein and DNase I endonuclease activity levels were determined by western blot, gel, and radial activity assays at different stages of the murine and human forms of the disease. Cellular localization of DNase I was analyzed by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy, and immunoelectron microscopy. We further compared DNase I levels in human native and transplanted kidneys to determine if the disease depended on autologous renal genes, or whether the nephritic process proceeded also in transplanted kidneys. The data indicate that reduced renal DNase I expression level relates to serious progression of lupus nephritis in murine, human native, and transplanted kidneys. Notably, silencing of renal DNase I correlated with loss of DNase I endonuclease activity in the urine samples. Thus, urinary DNase I levels may therefore be used as a marker of lupus nephritis disease progression and reduce the need for renal biopsies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-203
Number of pages11
JournalThe journal of pathology. Clinical research
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2018

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