Lymphokine-activated killer cell activity. Characteristics of effector cells and their progenitors in blood and spleen

Ronald B. Herberman, John Hiserodt, Nicola Vujanovic, Charles Balch, Eva Lotzova, Reinder Bolhuis, Sidney Golub, Lewis L. Lanier, Joseph H. Phillips, Carlo Riccardi, Jerome Ritz, Angela Santoni, Reinholdt E. Schmidt, Atsushi Uchida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Leukocytes in blood and spleen can be activated by interleukin 2 (IL-2) to become cytotoxic to certain tumor cell lines in vitro. Recent evidence suggests that such lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells can bring about the regression of solid tumors in animals and patients, under certain circumstances. Here, Ronald Herberman and colleagues from eight international laboratories, review what is known of the characteristics of LAK cell activity and conclude that most of it can be attributed to natural killer cells stimulated by IL-2.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)178-181
Number of pages4
JournalImmunology Today
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1987

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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    Herberman, R. B., Hiserodt, J., Vujanovic, N., Balch, C., Lotzova, E., Bolhuis, R., Golub, S., Lanier, L. L., Phillips, J. H., Riccardi, C., Ritz, J., Santoni, A., Schmidt, R. E., & Uchida, A. (1987). Lymphokine-activated killer cell activity. Characteristics of effector cells and their progenitors in blood and spleen. Immunology Today, 8(6), 178-181. https://doi.org/10.1016/0167-5699(87)90035-1