Malignancy-associated cellular markers (MAC) in oral and bronchial epithelial cells in sputum specimens: possible morphologic marker for high-risk groups (asbestos-exposed workers).

A. Vetrani, L. Palombini, M. Marino, R. Boschi, F. Fulciniti, G. Marino, A. Zabatta, P. Bianco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To verify a possible role of malignancy-associated cellular markers (MAC) in high-risk groups, the authors reviewed a total of 291 consecutive sputum specimens from 97 workers exposed to asbestos. The asbestos workers were matched according to smoking habits and cellular changes. Twelve subjects (12.3%) had MAC in epithelial cells; eight were smokers, four nonsmokers. Among MAC+ smokers, three sputum specimens contained cells of squamous metaplasia and one had cells from carcinoma in situ. Two MAC+ nonsmokers had cells of squamous metaplasia, too. In addition, MAC+ cells were also identified in four inflammatory samples, belonging either to smokers or nonsmokers. Two MAC+ subjects had a negative sputum specimen. In keeping with these results, the authors believe that MAC evaluation in sputum specimens might be of help in the oncologic follow-up of asbestos-exposed workers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)343-346
Number of pages4
JournalCancer Detection and Prevention
Volume9
Issue number3-4
Publication statusPublished - 1986

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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