Malignant tumors in first-degree relatives of cancer patients aged 0-25 years (Province of Trieste, Italy)

Davide Brunetti, Paolo Tamaro, Furio Cavallieri, Giorgio Stanta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine whether the occurrence of first and second primary malignancies in first-degree relatives of cancer patients aged 0-25 years (probands) differed from that in the general population, a cohort study was carried out on 860 relatives of 265 probands living in the province of Trieste, Italy. During the follow-up period (median duration = 28 years, 25th-75th percentile = 20-34), the relatives developed 103 first primary cancers vs. 88.9 expected for a standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of 1.2 (p = 0.2). Significantly elevated risks were found for melanoma in the parents of probands aged 15-25 years with melanoma (SIR = 15.0, p = 0.002), for hemolymphatic malignancies in the fathers of probands aged 0-14 years with brain tumors (SIR = 13.3, p = 0.0005) and for hemolymphatic cancers in relatives as a whole of probands aged 15-25 years with lymphomas (SIR = 4.5, p = 0.01). During the follow-up period, 7 relatives with a first primary cancer had a subsequent malignancy vs. 4.2 expected for an SIR of 1.7 (p = 0.3). Our results indicate that young cancer patients per se should not to be considered as a factor that usually increases the risk of developing malignant tumors among their first-degree relatives, except when a known cancer family syndrome or predisposition is recognized.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)252-259
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Cancer
Volume106
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 20 2003

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Italy
Neoplasms
Incidence
Melanoma
Second Primary Neoplasms
Brain Neoplasms
Fathers
Lymphoma
Cohort Studies
Parents
Population

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Children
  • Cohort study
  • Familial cancer
  • First-degree relatives
  • Second cancer
  • Young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Malignant tumors in first-degree relatives of cancer patients aged 0-25 years (Province of Trieste, Italy). / Brunetti, Davide; Tamaro, Paolo; Cavallieri, Furio; Stanta, Giorgio.

In: International Journal of Cancer, Vol. 106, No. 2, 20.08.2003, p. 252-259.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brunetti, Davide ; Tamaro, Paolo ; Cavallieri, Furio ; Stanta, Giorgio. / Malignant tumors in first-degree relatives of cancer patients aged 0-25 years (Province of Trieste, Italy). In: International Journal of Cancer. 2003 ; Vol. 106, No. 2. pp. 252-259.
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