Management of bronchiectasis in adults

James D. Chalmers, Stefano Aliberti, Francesco Blasi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

108 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Formerly regarded as a rare disease, bronchiectasis is now increasingly recognised and a renewed interest in the condition is stimulating drug development and clinical research. Bronchiectasis represents the final common pathway of a number of infectious, genetic, autoimmune, developmental and allergic disorders and is highly heterogeneous in its aetiology, impact and prognosis. The goals of therapy should be: To improve airway mucus clearance through physiotherapy with or without adjunctive therapies; to suppress, eradicate and prevent airway bacterial colonisation; to reduce airway inflammation; and to improve physical functioning and quality of life. Fortunately, an increasing body of evidence supports interventions in bronchiectasis. The field has benefited greatly from the introduction of evidence-based guidelines in some European countries and randomised controlled trials have now demonstrated the benefit of long-term macrolide therapy, with accumulating evidence for inhaled therapies, physiotherapy and pulmonary rehabilitation. This review provides a critical update on the management of bronchiectasis focussing on emerging evidence and recent randomised controlled trials.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1446-1462
Number of pages17
JournalEuropean Respiratory Journal
Volume45
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2015

Fingerprint

Bronchiectasis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Macrolides
Mucus
Therapeutics
Rare Diseases
Rehabilitation
Quality of Life
Guidelines
Inflammation
Lung
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Management of bronchiectasis in adults. / Chalmers, James D.; Aliberti, Stefano; Blasi, Francesco.

In: European Respiratory Journal, Vol. 45, No. 5, 01.05.2015, p. 1446-1462.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chalmers, James D. ; Aliberti, Stefano ; Blasi, Francesco. / Management of bronchiectasis in adults. In: European Respiratory Journal. 2015 ; Vol. 45, No. 5. pp. 1446-1462.
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