Management of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: Controversies and future approaches

Michael Samuel, Maria Rodriguez-Oroz, Angelo Antonini, Jonathan M. Brotchie, Kallol Ray Chaudhuri, Richard G. Brown, Wendy R. Galpern, Melissa J. Nirenberg, Michael S. Okun, Anthony E. Lang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease are a group of impulsive behaviors most often associated with dopaminergic treatment. Presently, there is a lack of high quality evidence available to guide their management. This manuscript reviews current management strategies, before concentrating on the concept of dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome and its implications for the management of impulse control disorders. Further, we focus on controversies, including the role of more recently available anti-parkinsonian drugs, and potential future approaches involving routes of drug delivery, nonpharmacological treatments (such as cognitive behavioral therapy and deep brain stimulation), and other as yet experimental strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)150-159
Number of pages10
JournalMovement Disorders
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2015

Fingerprint

Disruptive, Impulse Control, and Conduct Disorders
Parkinson Disease
Deep Brain Stimulation
Impulsive Behavior
Dopamine Agonists
Cognitive Therapy
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Clinical Trials
  • Deep Brain Stimulation
  • Dopamine Agonist Withdrawal
  • Impulse control
  • Management
  • Parkinson's

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Samuel, M., Rodriguez-Oroz, M., Antonini, A., Brotchie, J. M., Ray Chaudhuri, K., Brown, R. G., ... Lang, A. E. (2015). Management of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: Controversies and future approaches. Movement Disorders, 30(2), 150-159. https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.26099

Management of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease : Controversies and future approaches. / Samuel, Michael; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria; Antonini, Angelo; Brotchie, Jonathan M.; Ray Chaudhuri, Kallol; Brown, Richard G.; Galpern, Wendy R.; Nirenberg, Melissa J.; Okun, Michael S.; Lang, Anthony E.

In: Movement Disorders, Vol. 30, No. 2, 01.02.2015, p. 150-159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Samuel, M, Rodriguez-Oroz, M, Antonini, A, Brotchie, JM, Ray Chaudhuri, K, Brown, RG, Galpern, WR, Nirenberg, MJ, Okun, MS & Lang, AE 2015, 'Management of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: Controversies and future approaches', Movement Disorders, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 150-159. https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.26099
Samuel M, Rodriguez-Oroz M, Antonini A, Brotchie JM, Ray Chaudhuri K, Brown RG et al. Management of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: Controversies and future approaches. Movement Disorders. 2015 Feb 1;30(2):150-159. https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.26099
Samuel, Michael ; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria ; Antonini, Angelo ; Brotchie, Jonathan M. ; Ray Chaudhuri, Kallol ; Brown, Richard G. ; Galpern, Wendy R. ; Nirenberg, Melissa J. ; Okun, Michael S. ; Lang, Anthony E. / Management of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease : Controversies and future approaches. In: Movement Disorders. 2015 ; Vol. 30, No. 2. pp. 150-159.
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