Management of poor peripheral blood stem cell mobilization: Incidence, predictive factors, alternative strategies and outcome. A retrospective analysis on 2177 patients from three major Italian institutions

Paolo Perseghin, Elisabetta Terruzzi, Maria Dassi, Valentina Baldini, Matteo Parma, Paola Coluccia, Patrizia Accorsi, Giorgio Confalonieri, Luisa Tavecchia, Luisa Verga, Fernando Ravagnani, Antonio Iacone, E. M. Pogliani, Pietro Pioltelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

CD34+ peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are usually collected following mobilization therapy accomplished by using growth factors (GF) such as rHuG-CSF or rHuGM-CSF with or without chemotherapy. A target dose of yielded CD34+ is usually prescribed by the attending physician depending on different protocols, which may include single or double transplantation. HSC collection usually is performed when at least 20 CD34+ HSC/μL are detected by means of flow cytometry. A cumulative dose of at least 2 × 106/Kg/bw CD34+ HSC has been considered as the threshold to allow a prompt and persistent hematopoietic recovery. Unfortunately, this goal is not achieved by the totality of patients undergoing mobilization regimen. In fact, 5-46% of patients who underwent mobilization therapy fail HSC collection due to very low peripheral blood HSC CD34+ count. Patients' characteristics, including age, sex, stage of the underlying disease (complete or partial remission), diagnosis, previously administered radio/chemotherapy regimens, time-lapse from last chemotherapy before mobilization and mobilization schedule (including dose of GF) were considered as possibly predictive of poor or failed mobilization. We performed a retrospective analysis in 2177 patients from three large Italian academic institutions to assess the incidence of poor mobilizers within our patients' series. Therefore, a patient who fails a first mobilization (and when an HLA-compatible related on unrelated donor is not available) could undergo a second attempt either with different mobilization schedule or by using different GF, such as stem cell factor, growth hormone (GH), or more recently newly introduced drugs such as AMD3100, alone or in combination with rHuG- or -rHuGM-CSF. Thus, we investigated the fate of those who failed a first mobilization and subsequently underwent a second attempt or alternative therapeutic approaches.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-37
Number of pages5
JournalTransfusion and Apheresis Science
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2009

Fingerprint

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Incidence
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Drug Therapy
Appointments and Schedules
Unrelated Donors
Stem Cell Factor
Radio
Growth Hormone
Peripheral Blood Stem Cells
Flow Cytometry
Therapeutics
Cell Count
Transplantation
Physicians
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells
  • Poor mobilizers
  • Stem cell collection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Management of poor peripheral blood stem cell mobilization : Incidence, predictive factors, alternative strategies and outcome. A retrospective analysis on 2177 patients from three major Italian institutions. / Perseghin, Paolo; Terruzzi, Elisabetta; Dassi, Maria; Baldini, Valentina; Parma, Matteo; Coluccia, Paola; Accorsi, Patrizia; Confalonieri, Giorgio; Tavecchia, Luisa; Verga, Luisa; Ravagnani, Fernando; Iacone, Antonio; Pogliani, E. M.; Pioltelli, Pietro.

In: Transfusion and Apheresis Science, Vol. 41, No. 1, 08.2009, p. 33-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Perseghin, P, Terruzzi, E, Dassi, M, Baldini, V, Parma, M, Coluccia, P, Accorsi, P, Confalonieri, G, Tavecchia, L, Verga, L, Ravagnani, F, Iacone, A, Pogliani, EM & Pioltelli, P 2009, 'Management of poor peripheral blood stem cell mobilization: Incidence, predictive factors, alternative strategies and outcome. A retrospective analysis on 2177 patients from three major Italian institutions', Transfusion and Apheresis Science, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 33-37. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.transci.2009.05.011
Perseghin, Paolo ; Terruzzi, Elisabetta ; Dassi, Maria ; Baldini, Valentina ; Parma, Matteo ; Coluccia, Paola ; Accorsi, Patrizia ; Confalonieri, Giorgio ; Tavecchia, Luisa ; Verga, Luisa ; Ravagnani, Fernando ; Iacone, Antonio ; Pogliani, E. M. ; Pioltelli, Pietro. / Management of poor peripheral blood stem cell mobilization : Incidence, predictive factors, alternative strategies and outcome. A retrospective analysis on 2177 patients from three major Italian institutions. In: Transfusion and Apheresis Science. 2009 ; Vol. 41, No. 1. pp. 33-37.
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