Marked neointimal lipoprotein lipase increase in distinct models of proclivity to atherosclerosis: A feature independent of endothelial layer integrity

José P. Werba, Verónica Martinez, Denise P. Abulafia, Roberto Levy, Gabriel Magariños, Ricardo H. Rey, Roberta Baetta, Maurizio R. Soma, Alberto Diaz Añel, Luis A. Cuniberti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in the arterial wall has been proposed to enhance the retention of apoB-containing lipoproteins, an early event in atherosclerosis. As the neointima is considered the primary site of lipid accumulation in atherogenesis, the arterial expression and location of LPL was investigated in distinct experimental models of neointimal formation in normolipidemic rabbits and rats. Neointima elicited by balloon aortic denudation or raised beneath an anatomically intact endothelial layer by placing a silastic collar around the common carotid artery, both showed a striking LPL immunostaining that mostly co-localized with neointimal smooth muscle cells. Besides, increased LPL protein and mRNA in deendothelialized aortas was demonstrated by Western and Northern blot analysis, respectively, suggesting an enhanced expression of LPL in injured arteries. It was concluded that LPL is increased in neointima developed in either denuded vessels or arteries with a preserved endothelium, a finding which suggests that LPL abundance may be an attribute of the neointima, whatever the stimulus that promotes its formation. On the basis of former evidence concerning the role of LPL in lipid retention, this study provides a possible explanation for the injury-induced vessel susceptibility to atherosclerosis, and the particular proneness of the neointimal layer to lipid accretion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-101
Number of pages11
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume156
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2001

Keywords

  • Accelerated atherosclerosis
  • Collar model
  • Deendothelialization
  • Lipoprotein lipase
  • Neointima

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Marked neointimal lipoprotein lipase increase in distinct models of proclivity to atherosclerosis: A feature independent of endothelial layer integrity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this