Maternal age and body mass index at term

Risk factors for requiring an induced labour for a late-term pregnancy

Enrico Ferrazzi, Gloria Brembilla, Sonia Cipriani, Stefania Livio, Andrea Paganelli, Fabio Parazzini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: We investigated the role of body mass index (BMI) and maternal age on the risk of late-term induction, prolonged induction time and caesarean section (CS) after induction. Material and Methods: This is a retrospective, observational study. All women without any fetal or maternal pathological condition, uterine scars or any other indication for an elective caesarean birth and had a singleton foetus in the cephalic position at term were included. Results: A total of 4006 women had a spontaneous onset of labour and 612 were induced for a late-term pregnancy. Labour induction was significantly more common in overweight (Adj Odds Ratio (OR) 1.48 95%CI 1.22–1.78) and obese (Adj OR 1.63 95%CI 1.24–2.14) women. Among induced women, a BMI ≥ 30 was a risk factor for a prolonged induction time in both nulliparous (AdjOR 2.4, 95%CI 1.02–5.67) and multiparous women (AdjOR 4.24, 95%CI 1.02–17.6). A BMI > 25–29.9 was significantly associated with a prolonged induction time only in nulliparous women (AdjOR 1.86 95%CI 1.05–3.30). A CS was more frequent in overweight (AdjOR 1.74, 95% CI 1.052.89) and obese women (AdjOR 2.72, 95%CI 1.42–5.25). Nulliparous women ageed 30–34 years had an induction time longer than women <30 years (OR 2.04 95%CI 1.07–3.91). Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that a BMI > 25 kg/m2 at term of pregnancy is a risk factor for the induction of labour during a late-term pregnancy, a prolonged induction time and higher caesarean section rate.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)151-157
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Obstetrics Gynecology and Reproductive Biology
Volume233
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2019

Fingerprint

Induced Labor
Maternal Age
Body Mass Index
Pregnancy
Cesarean Section
Odds Ratio
Prolonged Pregnancy
Labor Onset
Cicatrix
Observational Studies
Fetus
Retrospective Studies
Head
Mothers
Parturition

Keywords

  • BMI
  • Induction of labour
  • Late-term pregnancy
  • Maternal age

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

@article{b07680f7b2eb486391dcc0362151e128,
title = "Maternal age and body mass index at term: Risk factors for requiring an induced labour for a late-term pregnancy",
abstract = "Introduction: We investigated the role of body mass index (BMI) and maternal age on the risk of late-term induction, prolonged induction time and caesarean section (CS) after induction. Material and Methods: This is a retrospective, observational study. All women without any fetal or maternal pathological condition, uterine scars or any other indication for an elective caesarean birth and had a singleton foetus in the cephalic position at term were included. Results: A total of 4006 women had a spontaneous onset of labour and 612 were induced for a late-term pregnancy. Labour induction was significantly more common in overweight (Adj Odds Ratio (OR) 1.48 95{\%}CI 1.22–1.78) and obese (Adj OR 1.63 95{\%}CI 1.24–2.14) women. Among induced women, a BMI ≥ 30 was a risk factor for a prolonged induction time in both nulliparous (AdjOR 2.4, 95{\%}CI 1.02–5.67) and multiparous women (AdjOR 4.24, 95{\%}CI 1.02–17.6). A BMI > 25–29.9 was significantly associated with a prolonged induction time only in nulliparous women (AdjOR 1.86 95{\%}CI 1.05–3.30). A CS was more frequent in overweight (AdjOR 1.74, 95{\%} CI 1.052.89) and obese women (AdjOR 2.72, 95{\%}CI 1.42–5.25). Nulliparous women ageed 30–34 years had an induction time longer than women <30 years (OR 2.04 95{\%}CI 1.07–3.91). Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that a BMI > 25 kg/m2 at term of pregnancy is a risk factor for the induction of labour during a late-term pregnancy, a prolonged induction time and higher caesarean section rate.",
keywords = "BMI, Induction of labour, Late-term pregnancy, Maternal age",
author = "Enrico Ferrazzi and Gloria Brembilla and Sonia Cipriani and Stefania Livio and Andrea Paganelli and Fabio Parazzini",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ejogrb.2018.12.018",
language = "English",
volume = "233",
pages = "151--157",
journal = "European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology",
issn = "0028-2243",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Maternal age and body mass index at term

T2 - Risk factors for requiring an induced labour for a late-term pregnancy

AU - Ferrazzi, Enrico

AU - Brembilla, Gloria

AU - Cipriani, Sonia

AU - Livio, Stefania

AU - Paganelli, Andrea

AU - Parazzini, Fabio

PY - 2019/2/1

Y1 - 2019/2/1

N2 - Introduction: We investigated the role of body mass index (BMI) and maternal age on the risk of late-term induction, prolonged induction time and caesarean section (CS) after induction. Material and Methods: This is a retrospective, observational study. All women without any fetal or maternal pathological condition, uterine scars or any other indication for an elective caesarean birth and had a singleton foetus in the cephalic position at term were included. Results: A total of 4006 women had a spontaneous onset of labour and 612 were induced for a late-term pregnancy. Labour induction was significantly more common in overweight (Adj Odds Ratio (OR) 1.48 95%CI 1.22–1.78) and obese (Adj OR 1.63 95%CI 1.24–2.14) women. Among induced women, a BMI ≥ 30 was a risk factor for a prolonged induction time in both nulliparous (AdjOR 2.4, 95%CI 1.02–5.67) and multiparous women (AdjOR 4.24, 95%CI 1.02–17.6). A BMI > 25–29.9 was significantly associated with a prolonged induction time only in nulliparous women (AdjOR 1.86 95%CI 1.05–3.30). A CS was more frequent in overweight (AdjOR 1.74, 95% CI 1.052.89) and obese women (AdjOR 2.72, 95%CI 1.42–5.25). Nulliparous women ageed 30–34 years had an induction time longer than women <30 years (OR 2.04 95%CI 1.07–3.91). Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that a BMI > 25 kg/m2 at term of pregnancy is a risk factor for the induction of labour during a late-term pregnancy, a prolonged induction time and higher caesarean section rate.

AB - Introduction: We investigated the role of body mass index (BMI) and maternal age on the risk of late-term induction, prolonged induction time and caesarean section (CS) after induction. Material and Methods: This is a retrospective, observational study. All women without any fetal or maternal pathological condition, uterine scars or any other indication for an elective caesarean birth and had a singleton foetus in the cephalic position at term were included. Results: A total of 4006 women had a spontaneous onset of labour and 612 were induced for a late-term pregnancy. Labour induction was significantly more common in overweight (Adj Odds Ratio (OR) 1.48 95%CI 1.22–1.78) and obese (Adj OR 1.63 95%CI 1.24–2.14) women. Among induced women, a BMI ≥ 30 was a risk factor for a prolonged induction time in both nulliparous (AdjOR 2.4, 95%CI 1.02–5.67) and multiparous women (AdjOR 4.24, 95%CI 1.02–17.6). A BMI > 25–29.9 was significantly associated with a prolonged induction time only in nulliparous women (AdjOR 1.86 95%CI 1.05–3.30). A CS was more frequent in overweight (AdjOR 1.74, 95% CI 1.052.89) and obese women (AdjOR 2.72, 95%CI 1.42–5.25). Nulliparous women ageed 30–34 years had an induction time longer than women <30 years (OR 2.04 95%CI 1.07–3.91). Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that a BMI > 25 kg/m2 at term of pregnancy is a risk factor for the induction of labour during a late-term pregnancy, a prolonged induction time and higher caesarean section rate.

KW - BMI

KW - Induction of labour

KW - Late-term pregnancy

KW - Maternal age

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85059117046&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85059117046&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ejogrb.2018.12.018

DO - 10.1016/j.ejogrb.2018.12.018

M3 - Article

VL - 233

SP - 151

EP - 157

JO - European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology

JF - European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology

SN - 0028-2243

ER -