Maternal and paternal caffeine intake and art outcomes in couples referring to an Italian fertility clinic: A prospective cohort

Elena Ricci, Stefania Noli, Sonia Cipriani, Irene La Vecchia, Francesca Chiaffarino, Stefania Ferrari, Paola Agnese Mauri, Marco Reschini, Luigi Fedele, Fabio Parazzini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Caffeine intake, a frequent lifestyle exposure, has a number of biological effects. We designed a cohort study to investigate the relation between lifestyle and assisted reproduction technique (ART) outcomes. From September 2014 to December 2016, 339 subfertile couples referring to an Italian fertility clinic and eligible for ART procedures were enrolled in our study. Sociodemographic characteristics, smoking, and usual alcohol and caffeine consumption in the year prior to ART were recorded. The mean age of participants was 36.6 ± 3.6 years in women and 39.4 ± 5.2 years in men. After oocytes retrieval, 293 (86.4%) underwent implantation, 110 (32.4%) achieved clinical pregnancy, and 82 (24.2%) live birth. Maternal age was the main determinant of ART outcome. In a model including women’s age and college degree, smoking habits, calorie and alcohol intake for both partners, previous ART cycles, and partner’s caffeine intake, we did not observe any association between caffeine intake and ART outcome. Using the first tertile of caffeine intake by women as a reference, the adjusted rate ratio (ARR) for live birth was 1.09 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79–1.50) in the second and 0.99 (95% CI 0.71–1.40) in the third tertiles. In conclusion, a moderate caffeine intake by women and men in the year prior to the ART procedure was not associated with negative ART outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1116
JournalNutrients
Volume10
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 17 2018

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Keywords

  • Assisted reproduction techniques
  • Caffeine intake
  • Clinical pregnancy
  • Implantation
  • Live birth
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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