Maxillary and mandibular base size in ancient skulls and of modern humans from Opi, Abruzzi, Italy: a cross-sectional study.

Felice Festa, Luigi Capasso, Ruggero D'Anastasio, Guiseppe Anastasi, Mario Festa, Sergio Caputi, Simona Tecco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The size and shape of the jaws are related to occlusion and masticatory muscle function. Consequently, teeth and muscles are considered the functional matrix for the two jaws. Existing studies did not focus on the relationship between maxillary and mandibular base but on just their absolute dimensions. As the relationship between the two is of interest to orthodontists, the aim of this study was to calculate the maxillary-mandibular ratio (m-m ratio) in individuals from Central Italy and to compare it to that of ancient skulls from the same geographic area. Forty individuals from Opi, a small, isolated mountain village in Central Italy, and 40 ancient skulls from the same region were the sample of this study. The lengths of the maxillary and mandibular base were assessed on lateral cephalograms, the m-m ratio was calculated, and the measurements between the groups were compared. Due to a significantly shorter maxillary base in the modern human sample, the m-m ratio was significantly lower in these subjects. This finding supports the hypothesis that growth of the skull is strongly modulated by the functional matrix, within which a morphologic unit develops. COPYRIGHT

Original languageEnglish
JournalWorld journal of orthodontics
Volume11
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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