Meditation-related activations are modulated by the practices needed to obtain it and by the expertise: An ALE meta-analysis study

Barbara Tomasino, Sara Fregona, Miran Skrap, Franco Fabbro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The brain network governing meditation has been studied using a variety of meditation practices and techniques practices eliciting different cognitive processes (e.g., silence, attention to own body, sense of joy, mantras, etc.). It is very possible that different practices of meditation are subserved by largely, if not entirely, disparate brain networks. This assumption was tested by conducting an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis of meditation neuroimaging studies, which assessed 150 activation foci from 24 experiments. Different ALE meta-analyses were carried out. One involved the subsets of studies involving meditation induced through exercising focused attention (FA). The network included clusters bilaterally in the medial gyrus, the left superior parietal lobe, the left insula and the right supramarginal gyrus (SMG). A second analysis addressed the studies involving meditation states induced by chanting or by repetition of words or phrases, known as "mantra." This type of practice elicited a cluster of activity in the right SMG, the SMA bilaterally and the left postcentral gyrus. Furthermore, the last analyses addressed the effect of meditation experience (i.e., short- vs. long-term meditators). We found that frontal activation was present for short-term, as compared with long-term experience meditators, confirming that experts are better enabled to sustain attentional focus, rather recruiting the right SMG and concentrating on aspects involving disembodiment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
Issue numberJAN
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 4 2013

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Meditation
Meta-Analysis
Parietal Lobe
Singing
Somatosensory Cortex
Brain
Neuroimaging

Keywords

  • ALE meta-analysis
  • Attention
  • Expertise
  • FMRI
  • Meditation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neurology
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Meditation-related activations are modulated by the practices needed to obtain it and by the expertise : An ALE meta-analysis study. / Tomasino, Barbara; Fregona, Sara; Skrap, Miran; Fabbro, Franco.

In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, No. JAN, 04.01.2013, p. 1-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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