Mediterranean diet and cancer

F. Berrino, P. Muti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A number of cancers, such as cancer of the large bowel, breast and other hormonal dependent organs, are less frequent in Mediterranean countries than in northern Europe. It has been hypothesized that a low dietary intake of saturated fat, accompanied by a higher intake of unrefined carbohydrates, and possibly other protective nutrients could be the cause of such risk differences. Cohort and case control studies based on individual dietary intake, however, cannot definitely corroborate the theory, nor disprove it. Analytical studies on fat, fibre and breast and colon cancers are reviewed and priorities for further studies are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-55
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume43
Issue numberSUPPL. 2
Publication statusPublished - 1989

Fingerprint

Mediterranean Diet
Mediterranean diet
Colonic Neoplasms
food intake
Fats
neoplasms
carbohydrate intake
Northern European region
case-control studies
colorectal neoplasms
Mediterranean region
breast neoplasms
breasts
Case-Control Studies
Neoplasms
Breast
dietary fiber
Carbohydrates
Breast Neoplasms
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Berrino, F., & Muti, P. (1989). Mediterranean diet and cancer. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 43(SUPPL. 2), 49-55.

Mediterranean diet and cancer. / Berrino, F.; Muti, P.

In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 43, No. SUPPL. 2, 1989, p. 49-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Berrino, F & Muti, P 1989, 'Mediterranean diet and cancer', European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 43, no. SUPPL. 2, pp. 49-55.
Berrino F, Muti P. Mediterranean diet and cancer. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1989;43(SUPPL. 2):49-55.
Berrino, F. ; Muti, P. / Mediterranean diet and cancer. In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1989 ; Vol. 43, No. SUPPL. 2. pp. 49-55.
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