Melanoma types by in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy correlated with protein and molecular genetic alterations: A pilot study.

Francesca Beretti, Laura Bertoni, Francesca Farnetani, Cristina Pellegrini, Greta Gorelli, Anna Maria Cesinaro, Luca Reggiani Bonetti, Lucia Di Nardo, Shaniko Kaleci, Johanna Chester, Caterina Longo, Daniela Massi, Maria C. Fargnoli, Giovanni Pellacani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cutaneous melanoma (CM) is one of the most prevalent skin cancers, which lacks both a prognostic marker and a specific and lasting treatment, due to the complexity of the disease and heterogeneity of patients. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) in vivo analysis is a versatile approach offering immediate morphological information, enabling the identification of four primary cutaneous RCM CM types. Whether RCM CM types are associated with a specific protein and molecular genetic profiles at the tissue level remains unclear. The current pilot study was designed to identify potential correlations between RCM CM types and specific biological characteristics, combining immunohistochemistry (IHC) and molecular analyses. Eighty primary CMs evaluated at patient bedside with RCM (type 1 [19, 24%], type 2 [12, 15%], type 3 [7, 9%] and type 4 [42, 52%]) were retrospectively evaluated by IHC stains (CD271, CD20, CD31, cyclin D1), fluorescence in situ hybridization FISH for MYC gain and CDKN2A loss and molecular analysis for somatic mutations (BRAF, NRAS and KIT). RCM CM types correlated with markers of stemness property, density of intra-tumoral lymphocytic B infiltrate and cyclin D1 expression, while no significant association was found with blood vessel density nor molecular findings. RCM CM types show a different marker profile expression, suggestive of a progression and an increase in aggressiveness, according to RCM morphologies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)254-260
Number of pages7
JournalExperimental Dermatology
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Dermatology

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