Metabolic syndrome and postmenopausal breast cancer in the ORDET cohort: A nested case-control study

C. Agnoli, F. Berrino, C. A. Abagnato, P. Muti, S. Panico, P. Crosignani, V. Krogh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

102 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and aims: The increase in breast cancer incidence over recent decades has been accompanied by an increase in the frequency of metabolic syndrome. Several studies suggest that breast cancer risk is associated with the components of metabolic syndrome (high serum glucose and triglycerides, low HDL-cholesterol, high blood pressure, and abdominal obesity), but no prospective study has investigated risk in relation to the presence of explicitly defined metabolic syndrome. We investigated associations between metabolic syndrome, its components, and breast cancer risk in a nested case-control study on postmenopausal women of the ORDET cohort. Methods and results: After a median follow-up of 13.5 years, 163 women developed breast cancer; metabolic syndrome was present in 29.8%. Four matched controls per case were selected by incidence density sampling, and rate ratios were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Metabolic syndrome (i.e. presence of three or more metabolic syndrome components) was significantly associated with breast cancer risk (rate ratio 1.58 [95% confidence interval 1.07-2.33]), with a significant risk increase for increasing number of components (P for trend 0.004). Among individual metabolic syndrome components, only low serum HDL-cholesterol and high triglycerides were significantly associated with increased risk. Conclusions: This prospective study indicates that metabolic syndrome is an important risk factor for breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Although serum HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides had the strongest association with breast cancer, all components may contribute to increased risk by multiple interacting mechanisms. Prevention or reversal of metabolic syndrome by life-style changes may be effective in preventing breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-48
Number of pages8
JournalNutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2010

Fingerprint

Case-Control Studies
Breast Neoplasms
Triglycerides
HDL Cholesterol
Hypoalphalipoproteinemias
Prospective Studies
Abdominal Obesity
Incidence
Serum
Life Style
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Hypertension
Glucose

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Nested case-control study
  • ORDET cohort
  • Postmenopausal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Metabolic syndrome and postmenopausal breast cancer in the ORDET cohort : A nested case-control study. / Agnoli, C.; Berrino, F.; Abagnato, C. A.; Muti, P.; Panico, S.; Crosignani, P.; Krogh, V.

In: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.2010, p. 41-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Agnoli, C. ; Berrino, F. ; Abagnato, C. A. ; Muti, P. ; Panico, S. ; Crosignani, P. ; Krogh, V. / Metabolic syndrome and postmenopausal breast cancer in the ORDET cohort : A nested case-control study. In: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases. 2010 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 41-48.
@article{beede2dc97ce4a778a8ee46dd154e281,
title = "Metabolic syndrome and postmenopausal breast cancer in the ORDET cohort: A nested case-control study",
abstract = "Background and aims: The increase in breast cancer incidence over recent decades has been accompanied by an increase in the frequency of metabolic syndrome. Several studies suggest that breast cancer risk is associated with the components of metabolic syndrome (high serum glucose and triglycerides, low HDL-cholesterol, high blood pressure, and abdominal obesity), but no prospective study has investigated risk in relation to the presence of explicitly defined metabolic syndrome. We investigated associations between metabolic syndrome, its components, and breast cancer risk in a nested case-control study on postmenopausal women of the ORDET cohort. Methods and results: After a median follow-up of 13.5 years, 163 women developed breast cancer; metabolic syndrome was present in 29.8{\%}. Four matched controls per case were selected by incidence density sampling, and rate ratios were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Metabolic syndrome (i.e. presence of three or more metabolic syndrome components) was significantly associated with breast cancer risk (rate ratio 1.58 [95{\%} confidence interval 1.07-2.33]), with a significant risk increase for increasing number of components (P for trend 0.004). Among individual metabolic syndrome components, only low serum HDL-cholesterol and high triglycerides were significantly associated with increased risk. Conclusions: This prospective study indicates that metabolic syndrome is an important risk factor for breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Although serum HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides had the strongest association with breast cancer, all components may contribute to increased risk by multiple interacting mechanisms. Prevention or reversal of metabolic syndrome by life-style changes may be effective in preventing breast cancer in postmenopausal women.",
keywords = "Breast cancer, Metabolic syndrome, Nested case-control study, ORDET cohort, Postmenopausal",
author = "C. Agnoli and F. Berrino and Abagnato, {C. A.} and P. Muti and S. Panico and P. Crosignani and V. Krogh",
year = "2010",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.numecd.2009.02.006",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "41--48",
journal = "Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases",
issn = "0939-4753",
publisher = "Elsevier B.V.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Metabolic syndrome and postmenopausal breast cancer in the ORDET cohort

T2 - A nested case-control study

AU - Agnoli, C.

AU - Berrino, F.

AU - Abagnato, C. A.

AU - Muti, P.

AU - Panico, S.

AU - Crosignani, P.

AU - Krogh, V.

PY - 2010/1

Y1 - 2010/1

N2 - Background and aims: The increase in breast cancer incidence over recent decades has been accompanied by an increase in the frequency of metabolic syndrome. Several studies suggest that breast cancer risk is associated with the components of metabolic syndrome (high serum glucose and triglycerides, low HDL-cholesterol, high blood pressure, and abdominal obesity), but no prospective study has investigated risk in relation to the presence of explicitly defined metabolic syndrome. We investigated associations between metabolic syndrome, its components, and breast cancer risk in a nested case-control study on postmenopausal women of the ORDET cohort. Methods and results: After a median follow-up of 13.5 years, 163 women developed breast cancer; metabolic syndrome was present in 29.8%. Four matched controls per case were selected by incidence density sampling, and rate ratios were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Metabolic syndrome (i.e. presence of three or more metabolic syndrome components) was significantly associated with breast cancer risk (rate ratio 1.58 [95% confidence interval 1.07-2.33]), with a significant risk increase for increasing number of components (P for trend 0.004). Among individual metabolic syndrome components, only low serum HDL-cholesterol and high triglycerides were significantly associated with increased risk. Conclusions: This prospective study indicates that metabolic syndrome is an important risk factor for breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Although serum HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides had the strongest association with breast cancer, all components may contribute to increased risk by multiple interacting mechanisms. Prevention or reversal of metabolic syndrome by life-style changes may be effective in preventing breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

AB - Background and aims: The increase in breast cancer incidence over recent decades has been accompanied by an increase in the frequency of metabolic syndrome. Several studies suggest that breast cancer risk is associated with the components of metabolic syndrome (high serum glucose and triglycerides, low HDL-cholesterol, high blood pressure, and abdominal obesity), but no prospective study has investigated risk in relation to the presence of explicitly defined metabolic syndrome. We investigated associations between metabolic syndrome, its components, and breast cancer risk in a nested case-control study on postmenopausal women of the ORDET cohort. Methods and results: After a median follow-up of 13.5 years, 163 women developed breast cancer; metabolic syndrome was present in 29.8%. Four matched controls per case were selected by incidence density sampling, and rate ratios were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Metabolic syndrome (i.e. presence of three or more metabolic syndrome components) was significantly associated with breast cancer risk (rate ratio 1.58 [95% confidence interval 1.07-2.33]), with a significant risk increase for increasing number of components (P for trend 0.004). Among individual metabolic syndrome components, only low serum HDL-cholesterol and high triglycerides were significantly associated with increased risk. Conclusions: This prospective study indicates that metabolic syndrome is an important risk factor for breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Although serum HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides had the strongest association with breast cancer, all components may contribute to increased risk by multiple interacting mechanisms. Prevention or reversal of metabolic syndrome by life-style changes may be effective in preventing breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

KW - Breast cancer

KW - Metabolic syndrome

KW - Nested case-control study

KW - ORDET cohort

KW - Postmenopausal

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=72749108254&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=72749108254&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.numecd.2009.02.006

DO - 10.1016/j.numecd.2009.02.006

M3 - Article

C2 - 19361966

AN - SCOPUS:72749108254

VL - 20

SP - 41

EP - 48

JO - Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases

JF - Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases

SN - 0939-4753

IS - 1

ER -