Metastasis as supra-cellular selection? A reply to Lean and Plutynski

Pierre Luc Germain, Lucie Laplane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In response to Germain (Biol Philos 27:785–810, 2012. doi:10.1007/s10539-012-9334-2) argument that evolution by natural selection has a limited explanatory power in cancer, Lean and Plutynski (Biol Philos 31:39–57, 2016. doi:10.1007/s10539-015-9511-1) have recently argued that many adaptations in cancer only make sense at the tumor level, and that cancer progression mirrors the major evolutionary transitions. While we agree that selection could potentially act at various levels of organization in cancers, we argue that tumor-level selection (MLS2) is unlikely to actually play a relevant role in our understanding of the somatic evolution of human cancers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalBiology and Philosophy
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Dec 8 2016

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metastasis
Neoplasm Metastasis
neoplasms
Neoplasms
Clonal Evolution
Genetic Selection
Cancer
natural selection

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Darwinian populations
  • Metastasis
  • Multi-level selection
  • Natural selection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Philosophy
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Metastasis as supra-cellular selection? A reply to Lean and Plutynski. / Germain, Pierre Luc; Laplane, Lucie.

In: Biology and Philosophy, 08.12.2016, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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