Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: the superbug

Giuseppe Ippolito, Sebastiano Leone, Francesco N. Lauria, Emanuele Nicastri, Richard P. Wenzel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Over the last decade, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains have emerged as serious pathogens in the nosocomial and community setting. Hospitalization costs associated with MRSA infections are substantially greater than those associated with methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) infections, and MRSA has wider economic effects that involve indirect costs to the patient and to society. In addition, there is some evidence suggesting that MRSA infections increase morbidity and the risk of mortality. Glycopeptides are the backbone antibiotics for the treatment of MRSA infections. However, several recent reports have highlighted the limitations of vancomycin, and its role in the management of serious infections is now being reconsidered. Several new antimicrobials demonstrate in vitro activity against MRSA and other Gram-positive bacteria. Data from large surveys indicate that linezolid, daptomycin, and tigecycline are almost universally active against MRSA. This review will briefly discuss the epidemiology, costs, outcome, and therapeutic options for the management of MRSA infections.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Infectious Diseases
Volume14
Issue numberSUPPL. 4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: the superbug'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this