Mevalonate pathway blockade, mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagy: A possible link

Paola Maura Tricarico, Sergio Crovella, Fulvio Celsi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The mevalonate pathway, crucial for cholesterol synthesis, plays a key role in multiple cellular processes. Deregulation of this pathway is also correlated with diminished protein prenylation, an important post-translational modification necessary to localize certain proteins, such as small GTPases, to membranes. Mevalonate pathway blockade has been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction: especially involving lower mitochondrial membrane potential and increased release of pro-apoptotic factors in cytosol. Furthermore a severe reduction of protein prenylation has also been associated with defective autophagy, possibly causing inflammasome activation and subsequent cell death. So, it is tempting to hypothesize a mechanism in which defective autophagy fails to remove damaged mitochondria, resulting in increased cell death. This mechanism could play a significant role in Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency, an autoinflammatory disease characterized by a defect in Mevalonate Kinase, a key enzyme of the mevalonate pathway. Patients carrying mutations in the MVK gene, encoding this enzyme, show increased inflammation and lower protein prenylation levels. This review aims at analysing the correlation between mevalonate pathway defects, mitochondrial dysfunction and defective autophagy, as well as inflammation, using Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency as a model to clarify the current pathogenetic hypothesis as the basis of the disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)16067-16084
Number of pages18
JournalInternational Journal of Molecular Sciences
Volume16
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 15 2015

Fingerprint

mevalonate kinase
Mevalonic Acid
Protein Prenylation
Autophagy
Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency
proteins
Proteins
Cell death
death
enzymes
Cell Death
Enzymes
Inflammasomes
membranes
Inflammation
Membranes
Deficiency Diseases
Defects
Mitochondria
Gene encoding

Keywords

  • Autophagy
  • Inflammation
  • Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency
  • Mevalonate pathway
  • Mitochondrial dysfunction
  • Statins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Spectroscopy
  • Inorganic Chemistry
  • Catalysis
  • Molecular Biology
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Mevalonate pathway blockade, mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagy : A possible link. / Tricarico, Paola Maura; Crovella, Sergio; Celsi, Fulvio.

In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, Vol. 16, No. 7, 15.07.2015, p. 16067-16084.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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