Microbiome analytics of the gut microbiota in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients: an observational, longitudinal cohort study

MD-Paedigree consortium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To assess the composition of gut microbiota in Italian and Dutch juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients at baseline, in inactive disease and persistent activity, compared to healthy controls.

METHODS: In a prospective, multicenter, observational cohort study, fecal samples were collected of 78 Italian and 21 Dutch treatment-naïve JIA patients at baseline with less than 6 months disease duration and compared to 107 geography-matched samples of healthy children. Furthermore, 44 follow up samples in inactive disease and 25 in persistent activity were analyzed. Gut microbiota composition was determined by 16S rRNA-based-metagenomics. The α- and β-diversity were computed, and log-ratios of relative abundance were compared between patients and healthy controls using random forest models and logistic regression.

RESULTS: Italian baseline samples showed reduced richness compared to healthy controls (p <0.001). Random forest distinguished Italian baseline samples from controls and suggested differences between Dutch samples and controls (area under the curve >0.99 and 0.71, respectively). Mainly the Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) Erysipelotrichaceae (increased in patients), Allobaculum (decreased) and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (increased) showed different relative abundance in Italian baseline samples compared to controls after controlling for multiple comparisons. Some OTUs differed between Dutch samples and healthy controls, but no evidence remained after controlling for multiple comparisons. No differences were found in paired analysis between Italian baseline and inactive disease samples.

CONCLUSIONS: We found evidence for dysbiosis in JIA patients. Only patient/control status, age and geographical origin appeared to be drivers of the microbiota profiles, regardless of disease activity stage, inflammation and autoimmunity markers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
JournalArthritis and Rheumatology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Dec 28 2018

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Juvenile Arthritis
Microbiota
Longitudinal Studies
Cohort Studies
Dysbiosis
Metagenomics
Geography
Autoimmunity
Observational Studies
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Logistic Models
Inflammation

Cite this

@article{3d69c60b27a247e391ee71e447081aa1,
title = "Microbiome analytics of the gut microbiota in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients: an observational, longitudinal cohort study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To assess the composition of gut microbiota in Italian and Dutch juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients at baseline, in inactive disease and persistent activity, compared to healthy controls.METHODS: In a prospective, multicenter, observational cohort study, fecal samples were collected of 78 Italian and 21 Dutch treatment-na{\"i}ve JIA patients at baseline with less than 6 months disease duration and compared to 107 geography-matched samples of healthy children. Furthermore, 44 follow up samples in inactive disease and 25 in persistent activity were analyzed. Gut microbiota composition was determined by 16S rRNA-based-metagenomics. The α- and β-diversity were computed, and log-ratios of relative abundance were compared between patients and healthy controls using random forest models and logistic regression.RESULTS: Italian baseline samples showed reduced richness compared to healthy controls (p <0.001). Random forest distinguished Italian baseline samples from controls and suggested differences between Dutch samples and controls (area under the curve >0.99 and 0.71, respectively). Mainly the Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) Erysipelotrichaceae (increased in patients), Allobaculum (decreased) and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (increased) showed different relative abundance in Italian baseline samples compared to controls after controlling for multiple comparisons. Some OTUs differed between Dutch samples and healthy controls, but no evidence remained after controlling for multiple comparisons. No differences were found in paired analysis between Italian baseline and inactive disease samples.CONCLUSIONS: We found evidence for dysbiosis in JIA patients. Only patient/control status, age and geographical origin appeared to be drivers of the microbiota profiles, regardless of disease activity stage, inflammation and autoimmunity markers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
author = "{MD-Paedigree consortium} and {van Dijkhuizen}, {E H Pieter} and {Del Chierico}, Federica and Clara Malattia and Alessandra Russo and {Pires Marafon}, Denise and {Ter Haar}, {Nienke M} and Silvia Magni-Manzoni and Vastert, {Sebastiaan J} and Bruno Dallapiccola and Berent Prakken and Alberto Martini and {De Benedetti}, Fabrizio and Lorenza Putignani",
note = "This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1002/art.40827",
language = "English",
journal = "Arthritis and Rheumatology",
issn = "2326-5191",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Microbiome analytics of the gut microbiota in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

T2 - an observational, longitudinal cohort study

AU - MD-Paedigree consortium

AU - van Dijkhuizen, E H Pieter

AU - Del Chierico, Federica

AU - Malattia, Clara

AU - Russo, Alessandra

AU - Pires Marafon, Denise

AU - Ter Haar, Nienke M

AU - Magni-Manzoni, Silvia

AU - Vastert, Sebastiaan J

AU - Dallapiccola, Bruno

AU - Prakken, Berent

AU - Martini, Alberto

AU - De Benedetti, Fabrizio

AU - Putignani, Lorenza

N1 - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PY - 2018/12/28

Y1 - 2018/12/28

N2 - OBJECTIVES: To assess the composition of gut microbiota in Italian and Dutch juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients at baseline, in inactive disease and persistent activity, compared to healthy controls.METHODS: In a prospective, multicenter, observational cohort study, fecal samples were collected of 78 Italian and 21 Dutch treatment-naïve JIA patients at baseline with less than 6 months disease duration and compared to 107 geography-matched samples of healthy children. Furthermore, 44 follow up samples in inactive disease and 25 in persistent activity were analyzed. Gut microbiota composition was determined by 16S rRNA-based-metagenomics. The α- and β-diversity were computed, and log-ratios of relative abundance were compared between patients and healthy controls using random forest models and logistic regression.RESULTS: Italian baseline samples showed reduced richness compared to healthy controls (p <0.001). Random forest distinguished Italian baseline samples from controls and suggested differences between Dutch samples and controls (area under the curve >0.99 and 0.71, respectively). Mainly the Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) Erysipelotrichaceae (increased in patients), Allobaculum (decreased) and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (increased) showed different relative abundance in Italian baseline samples compared to controls after controlling for multiple comparisons. Some OTUs differed between Dutch samples and healthy controls, but no evidence remained after controlling for multiple comparisons. No differences were found in paired analysis between Italian baseline and inactive disease samples.CONCLUSIONS: We found evidence for dysbiosis in JIA patients. Only patient/control status, age and geographical origin appeared to be drivers of the microbiota profiles, regardless of disease activity stage, inflammation and autoimmunity markers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To assess the composition of gut microbiota in Italian and Dutch juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients at baseline, in inactive disease and persistent activity, compared to healthy controls.METHODS: In a prospective, multicenter, observational cohort study, fecal samples were collected of 78 Italian and 21 Dutch treatment-naïve JIA patients at baseline with less than 6 months disease duration and compared to 107 geography-matched samples of healthy children. Furthermore, 44 follow up samples in inactive disease and 25 in persistent activity were analyzed. Gut microbiota composition was determined by 16S rRNA-based-metagenomics. The α- and β-diversity were computed, and log-ratios of relative abundance were compared between patients and healthy controls using random forest models and logistic regression.RESULTS: Italian baseline samples showed reduced richness compared to healthy controls (p <0.001). Random forest distinguished Italian baseline samples from controls and suggested differences between Dutch samples and controls (area under the curve >0.99 and 0.71, respectively). Mainly the Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) Erysipelotrichaceae (increased in patients), Allobaculum (decreased) and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (increased) showed different relative abundance in Italian baseline samples compared to controls after controlling for multiple comparisons. Some OTUs differed between Dutch samples and healthy controls, but no evidence remained after controlling for multiple comparisons. No differences were found in paired analysis between Italian baseline and inactive disease samples.CONCLUSIONS: We found evidence for dysbiosis in JIA patients. Only patient/control status, age and geographical origin appeared to be drivers of the microbiota profiles, regardless of disease activity stage, inflammation and autoimmunity markers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

U2 - 10.1002/art.40827

DO - 10.1002/art.40827

M3 - Article

C2 - 30592383

JO - Arthritis and Rheumatology

JF - Arthritis and Rheumatology

SN - 2326-5191

ER -