MicroRNA expression in sentinel nodes fromprogressing melanoma patients identifies networks associated with dysfunctional immune response

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) is a main staging biomarker in melanoma and is the first lymph node to drain the tumor, thus representing the immunological site where anti-tumor immune dysfunction is established and where potential prognostic immune markers can be identified. Here we analyzed microRNA (miR) profiles in archival tumor-positive SNBs derived from melanoma patients with different outcomes and performed an integrated analysis of transcriptional data to identify deregulated immune signaling networks. Twenty-six miRs were differentially expressed in melanoma-positive SNB samples between patients with disease progression and non-progressing patients, the majority being previously reported in the regulation of immune responses. A significant variation in miR expression levels was confirmed in an independent set of SNB samples. Integrated information from genome-wide transcriptional profiles and in vitro assessment in immune cells led to the identification of miRs associated with the regulation of the TNF receptor superfamily member 8 (TNFRSF8) gene encoding the CD30 receptor, a marker increased in lymphocytes of melanoma patients with progressive disease. These findings indicate that miRs are involved in the regulation of pathways leading to immune dysfunction in the sentinel node and may provide valuable markers for developing prognostic molecular signatures for the identification of stage III melanoma patients at risk of recurrence.

Original languageEnglish
Article number124
JournalGenes
Volume7
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 14 2016

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MicroRNAs
Melanoma
Biopsy
Biomarkers
Neoplasms
Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptors
Disease Progression
Lymph Nodes
cyhalothrin
Genome
Lymphocytes
Recurrence
Genes

Keywords

  • CD30
  • Immunosuppression
  • Melanoma
  • MicroRNA
  • Sentinel node biopsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

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title = "MicroRNA expression in sentinel nodes fromprogressing melanoma patients identifies networks associated with dysfunctional immune response",
abstract = "Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) is a main staging biomarker in melanoma and is the first lymph node to drain the tumor, thus representing the immunological site where anti-tumor immune dysfunction is established and where potential prognostic immune markers can be identified. Here we analyzed microRNA (miR) profiles in archival tumor-positive SNBs derived from melanoma patients with different outcomes and performed an integrated analysis of transcriptional data to identify deregulated immune signaling networks. Twenty-six miRs were differentially expressed in melanoma-positive SNB samples between patients with disease progression and non-progressing patients, the majority being previously reported in the regulation of immune responses. A significant variation in miR expression levels was confirmed in an independent set of SNB samples. Integrated information from genome-wide transcriptional profiles and in vitro assessment in immune cells led to the identification of miRs associated with the regulation of the TNF receptor superfamily member 8 (TNFRSF8) gene encoding the CD30 receptor, a marker increased in lymphocytes of melanoma patients with progressive disease. These findings indicate that miRs are involved in the regulation of pathways leading to immune dysfunction in the sentinel node and may provide valuable markers for developing prognostic molecular signatures for the identification of stage III melanoma patients at risk of recurrence.",
keywords = "CD30, Immunosuppression, Melanoma, MicroRNA, Sentinel node biopsy",
author = "Viviana Vallacchi and Chiara Camisaschi and Matteo Dugo and Elisabetta Vergani and Paola Deho and Gualeni, {Ambra Vittoria} and Veronica Huber and Annunziata Gloghini and Andrea Maurichi and Mario Santinami and Marialuisa Sensi and Chiara Castelli and Licia Rivoltini and Monica Rodolfo",
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AU - Vallacchi, Viviana

AU - Camisaschi, Chiara

AU - Dugo, Matteo

AU - Vergani, Elisabetta

AU - Deho, Paola

AU - Gualeni, Ambra Vittoria

AU - Huber, Veronica

AU - Gloghini, Annunziata

AU - Maurichi, Andrea

AU - Santinami, Mario

AU - Sensi, Marialuisa

AU - Castelli, Chiara

AU - Rivoltini, Licia

AU - Rodolfo, Monica

PY - 2016/12/14

Y1 - 2016/12/14

N2 - Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) is a main staging biomarker in melanoma and is the first lymph node to drain the tumor, thus representing the immunological site where anti-tumor immune dysfunction is established and where potential prognostic immune markers can be identified. Here we analyzed microRNA (miR) profiles in archival tumor-positive SNBs derived from melanoma patients with different outcomes and performed an integrated analysis of transcriptional data to identify deregulated immune signaling networks. Twenty-six miRs were differentially expressed in melanoma-positive SNB samples between patients with disease progression and non-progressing patients, the majority being previously reported in the regulation of immune responses. A significant variation in miR expression levels was confirmed in an independent set of SNB samples. Integrated information from genome-wide transcriptional profiles and in vitro assessment in immune cells led to the identification of miRs associated with the regulation of the TNF receptor superfamily member 8 (TNFRSF8) gene encoding the CD30 receptor, a marker increased in lymphocytes of melanoma patients with progressive disease. These findings indicate that miRs are involved in the regulation of pathways leading to immune dysfunction in the sentinel node and may provide valuable markers for developing prognostic molecular signatures for the identification of stage III melanoma patients at risk of recurrence.

AB - Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) is a main staging biomarker in melanoma and is the first lymph node to drain the tumor, thus representing the immunological site where anti-tumor immune dysfunction is established and where potential prognostic immune markers can be identified. Here we analyzed microRNA (miR) profiles in archival tumor-positive SNBs derived from melanoma patients with different outcomes and performed an integrated analysis of transcriptional data to identify deregulated immune signaling networks. Twenty-six miRs were differentially expressed in melanoma-positive SNB samples between patients with disease progression and non-progressing patients, the majority being previously reported in the regulation of immune responses. A significant variation in miR expression levels was confirmed in an independent set of SNB samples. Integrated information from genome-wide transcriptional profiles and in vitro assessment in immune cells led to the identification of miRs associated with the regulation of the TNF receptor superfamily member 8 (TNFRSF8) gene encoding the CD30 receptor, a marker increased in lymphocytes of melanoma patients with progressive disease. These findings indicate that miRs are involved in the regulation of pathways leading to immune dysfunction in the sentinel node and may provide valuable markers for developing prognostic molecular signatures for the identification of stage III melanoma patients at risk of recurrence.

KW - CD30

KW - Immunosuppression

KW - Melanoma

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KW - Sentinel node biopsy

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