Microscopic colitis progressed to collagenous colitis: A morphometric study

F. Perri, V. Annese, M. Pastore, A. Andriulli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Microscopic (also called lymphocytic) colitis and collagenous colitis are two newly recognised clinicopathologic entities of unknown aetiology presenting with chronic watery diarrhoea. In both conditions, the colon appears normal by barium enema and colonoscopy, however, colonic biopsies reveal infiltration of plasma cells and neutrophils within the lamina propria and increased intraepithelial lymphocytes within the surface epithelium. Lack of a thickened collagen band beneath the surface epithelium histologically differentiates microscopic from collagenous colitis. The exact relationship between the two disorders is as yet unknown. The two entities may be variants of the same spectrum of disease or distinct conditions with and without collagen table thickening. The present case report shows progression of microscopic colitis to collagenous colitis in sequential colonic biopsies taken from a patient during a 7-year endoscopic follow-up suggesting that progression of microscopic to collagenous colitis is a possibility and the two diseases are likely to represent variants of the same condition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147-151
Number of pages5
JournalItalian Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume28
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1996

Fingerprint

Microscopic Colitis
Collagenous Colitis
Lymphocytic Colitis
Collagen
Epithelium
Biopsy
Colonoscopy
Plasma Cells
Diarrhea
Colon
Mucous Membrane
Neutrophils
Lymphocytes

Keywords

  • Collagenous colitis
  • Diarrhoea
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Lymphocytic colitis
  • Microscopic colitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Microscopic colitis progressed to collagenous colitis : A morphometric study. / Perri, F.; Annese, V.; Pastore, M.; Andriulli, A.

In: Italian Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 28, No. 3, 1996, p. 147-151.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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