Microvascular damage and platelet abnormalities in early Alzheimer's disease

Barbara Borroni, Nabil Akkawi, Giuliana Martini, Francesca Colciaghi, Paola Prometti, Luca Rozzini, Monica Di Luca, Gian Luigi Lenzi, Giuseppe Romanelli, Luigi Caimi, Alessandro Padovani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Accumulating evidence from epidemiological and clinical studies suggests that vascular risk factors may be involved in Alzheimer disease (AD). Although the precise contribution of vascular disturbances to the pathogenesis of AD is still unclear, various biochemical and neuropathological data strengthen the view that cerebrovascular deficiencies such as reduced blood supply to the brain and disrupted microvascular integrity in brain parenchyma play a direct or intermediate role in the chain of events ending with a dementia syndrome. The present review focuses on platelet abnormalities and hemostatic alterations in AD. In particular, data from our group, along with current literature, are discussed with regard to the evidence of platelets amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing disturbances in early AD as well as to the recent observations of increased serum levels of thrombomodulin and sE-selectin, which are sensitive markers of endothelial dysfunction. These findings strongly indicate that platelet dysfunction and microvasculature deficiencies occur rather early during the course of AD, thus suggesting a further link between AD-related processes and vascular disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-193
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the Neurological Sciences
Volume203-204
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 15 2002

Fingerprint

Alzheimer Disease
Blood Platelets
Blood Vessels
Thrombomodulin
Selectins
Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor
Brain
Hemostatics
Microvessels
Dementia
Epidemiologic Studies
Serum

Keywords

  • Alzheimer disease
  • Endothelial dysfunction
  • Hemostasis changes
  • Platelets
  • Thrombomodulin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ageing
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Microvascular damage and platelet abnormalities in early Alzheimer's disease. / Borroni, Barbara; Akkawi, Nabil; Martini, Giuliana; Colciaghi, Francesca; Prometti, Paola; Rozzini, Luca; Di Luca, Monica; Lenzi, Gian Luigi; Romanelli, Giuseppe; Caimi, Luigi; Padovani, Alessandro.

In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences, Vol. 203-204, 15.11.2002, p. 189-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Borroni, B, Akkawi, N, Martini, G, Colciaghi, F, Prometti, P, Rozzini, L, Di Luca, M, Lenzi, GL, Romanelli, G, Caimi, L & Padovani, A 2002, 'Microvascular damage and platelet abnormalities in early Alzheimer's disease', Journal of the Neurological Sciences, vol. 203-204, pp. 189-193. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-510X(02)00289-7
Borroni, Barbara ; Akkawi, Nabil ; Martini, Giuliana ; Colciaghi, Francesca ; Prometti, Paola ; Rozzini, Luca ; Di Luca, Monica ; Lenzi, Gian Luigi ; Romanelli, Giuseppe ; Caimi, Luigi ; Padovani, Alessandro. / Microvascular damage and platelet abnormalities in early Alzheimer's disease. In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences. 2002 ; Vol. 203-204. pp. 189-193.
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