Migration of calcium deposits into subacromial–subdeltoid bursa and into humeral head as a rare complication of calcifying tendinitis: sonography and imaging

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder is a common condition characterized by the deposition of calcium, predominantly hydroxyapatite crystals, in the rotator cuff. A rare complication of this condition is the migration of calcium deposits from tendons, usually the supraspinatus, into the subacromial–subdeltoid bursa or into the humeral greater tuberosity. These complications are responsible for intense acute shoulder pain and functional disability. Patient anamnesis and clinical symptoms must be considered to make the diagnosis, but imaging, particularly sonography, is often necessary, showing a typical presentation related to the locations of calcium deposits. We present sonographic and other imaging features of subacromial–subdeltoid bursitis and humeral osteitis related to the migration of calcium.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-263
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Ultrasound
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 11 2015

Keywords

  • Calcifying tendinitis
  • Humeral osteitis
  • Shoulder pain
  • Sonography
  • Subacromial–subdeltoid bursitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Internal Medicine

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