Minilaparoscopic colorectal resections: Technical note

S. Bona, M. Molteni, M. Montorsi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Laparoscopic colorectal resections have been shown to provide short-term advantages in terms of postoperative pain, general morbidity, recovery, and quality of life. To date, long-term results have been proved to be comparable to open surgery irrefutably only for colon cancer. Recently, new trends keep arising in the direction of minimal invasiveness to reduce surgical trauma after colorectal surgery in order to improve morbidity and cosmetic results. The few reports available in the literature on single-port technique show promising results. Natural orifices endoscopic techniques still have very limited application. We focused our efforts in standardising a minilaparoscopic technique (using 3 to 5 mm instruments) for colorectal resections since it can provide excellent cosmetic results without changing the laparoscopic approach significantly. Thus, there is no need for a new learning curve as minilaparoscopy maintains the principle of instrument triangulation. This determines an undoubted advantage in terms of feasibility and reproducibility of the procedure without increasing operative time. Some preliminary experiences confirm that minilaparoscopic colorectal surgery provides acceptable results, comparable to those reported for laparoscopic surgery with regard to operative time, morbidity, and hospital stay. Randomized controlled studies should be conducted to confirm these early encouraging results.

Original languageEnglish
Article number482079
JournalMinimally Invasive Surgery
Volume2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Colorectal Surgery
Operative Time
Morbidity
Cosmetics
Learning Curve
Postoperative Pain
Laparoscopy
Colonic Neoplasms
Length of Stay
Quality of Life
Wounds and Injuries
Direction compound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Minilaparoscopic colorectal resections : Technical note. / Bona, S.; Molteni, M.; Montorsi, M.

In: Minimally Invasive Surgery, Vol. 2012, 482079, 2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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