Minimally invasive surgery for colorectal cancer: Quality of life and satisfaction with care in elderly patients

Marco Scarpa, Loretta Di Cristofaro, Matteo Cortinovis, Eleonora Pinto, Maurizio Massa, Rita Alfieri, Matteo Cagol, Luca Saadeh, Aurelio Costa, Carlo Castoro, Nicolò Bassi, Cesare Ruffolo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this multicentric prospective study was to evaluate postoperative HRQL and satisfaction with care after laparoscopic colonic resection for colorectal cancer in elderly patients. Methods: A total of 116 patients were enrolled in this study: 33 patients older than age 70 years had laparoscopic colectomy, whereas 24 had open colectomy; 44 patients younger than age 70 years had laparoscopic colectomy and 15 of them had open colectomy. The patients answered to three questionnaires about generic (EORTC QLQ C30) and disease-specific quality of life (EORTC CR29) and about treatment satisfaction (EORTC IN-PATSAT32). Nonparametric tests and forward stepwise multiple regression analysis were used for statistical analysis. Results: One month after surgery, global quality of life (QL2 item) was significantly impaired in elderly patients who had laparoscopic colectomy compared with younger patients who had the same operation (p = 0.003). Similarly, role function (RF), physical function (PF), emotional function (EF), cognitive function (CF), and social function (SF) were impaired in elderly patients who had laparoscopic colectomy compared with younger patients (p <0.001, p <0.001, p = 0.013, p <0.001, p = 0.01, respectively). Fatigue (FA), sleep disturbances (SL), appetite loss (AP), and dyspnea (DY) affected the quality of life of these patients more than younger patients (p <0.001, p = 0.055, p = 0.051, and p = 0.003, respectively). Conclusions: Elderly patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy for cancer experience less postoperative local complications than elderly patients undergoing open colectomy. Nevertheless, in the first postoperative month, these patients experience a worse global quality of life than younger patients undergoing the same operation with impairment of all the functions and the presence of fatigue, sleep disturbances, appetite loss, and dyspnea.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2911-2920
Number of pages10
JournalSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques
Volume27
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2013

Keywords

  • Colorectal cancer
  • Laparoscopic assisted colonic resection
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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