Mitochondrial gateways to cancer

Lorenzo Galluzzi, Eugenia Morselli, Oliver Kepp, Ilio Vitale, Alice Rigoni, Erika Vacchelli, Mickael Michaud, Hans Zischka, Maria Castedo, Guido Kroemer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

165 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mitochondria are required for cellular survival, yet can also orchestrate cell death. The peculiar biochemical properties of these organelles, which are intimately linked to their compartmentalized ultrastructure, provide an optimal microenvironment for multiple biosynthetic and bioenergetic pathways. Most intracellular ATP is generated by mitochondrial respiration, which also represents the most relevant source of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Mitochondria participate in a plethora of anabolic pathways, including cholesterol, cardiolipin, heme and nucleotide biosynthesis. Moreover, mitochondria integrate numerous pro-survival and pro-death signals, thereby exerting a decisive control over several biochemical cascades leading to cell death, in particular the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Therefore, it is not surprising that cancer cells often manifest the deregulation of one or several mitochondrial functions. The six classical hallmarks of cancer (i.e., limitless replication, self-provision of proliferative stimuli, insensitivity to antiproliferative signals, disabled apoptosis, sustained angiogenesis, invasiveness/metastatic potential), as well as other common features of tumors (i.e., avoidance of the immune response, enhanced anabolic metabolism, disabled autophagy) may directly or indirectly implicate deregulated mitochondria. In this review, we discuss several mechanisms by which mitochondria can contribute to malignant transformation and tumor progression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-20
Number of pages20
JournalMolecular Aspects of Medicine
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2010

Fingerprint

Mitochondria
Cell death
Neoplasms
Tumors
Cell Death
Apoptosis
Cardiolipins
Deregulation
Biosynthesis
Biosynthetic Pathways
Autophagy
Heme
Metabolism
Organelles
Energy Metabolism
Reactive Oxygen Species
Respiration
Nucleotides
Adenosine Triphosphate
Cholesterol

Keywords

  • Bcl-2
  • Caspases
  • Mitochondrial transmembrane potential
  • Oncoproteins
  • p53
  • Tumor suppressors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Galluzzi, L., Morselli, E., Kepp, O., Vitale, I., Rigoni, A., Vacchelli, E., ... Kroemer, G. (2010). Mitochondrial gateways to cancer. Molecular Aspects of Medicine, 31(1), 1-20. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mam.2009.08.002

Mitochondrial gateways to cancer. / Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Morselli, Eugenia; Kepp, Oliver; Vitale, Ilio; Rigoni, Alice; Vacchelli, Erika; Michaud, Mickael; Zischka, Hans; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido.

In: Molecular Aspects of Medicine, Vol. 31, No. 1, 02.2010, p. 1-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Galluzzi, L, Morselli, E, Kepp, O, Vitale, I, Rigoni, A, Vacchelli, E, Michaud, M, Zischka, H, Castedo, M & Kroemer, G 2010, 'Mitochondrial gateways to cancer', Molecular Aspects of Medicine, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 1-20. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mam.2009.08.002
Galluzzi L, Morselli E, Kepp O, Vitale I, Rigoni A, Vacchelli E et al. Mitochondrial gateways to cancer. Molecular Aspects of Medicine. 2010 Feb;31(1):1-20. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mam.2009.08.002
Galluzzi, Lorenzo ; Morselli, Eugenia ; Kepp, Oliver ; Vitale, Ilio ; Rigoni, Alice ; Vacchelli, Erika ; Michaud, Mickael ; Zischka, Hans ; Castedo, Maria ; Kroemer, Guido. / Mitochondrial gateways to cancer. In: Molecular Aspects of Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 31, No. 1. pp. 1-20.
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