Mitomycin C modulation of corneal wound healing after photorefractive keratectomy in highly myopic eyes

Catia Gambato, Alessandra Ghirlando, Erika Moretto, Fabiola Busato, Edoardo Midena

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the role of topical mitomycin C in corneal wound healing (CWH) after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) in highly myopic eyes. Design: Prospective, double-masked, randomized clinical trial. Participants: Seventy-two eyes of 36 patients affected by high (>7 diopters) myopia. Methods: In each patient, one eye was randomly assigned to PRK with intraoperative topical 0.02% mitomycin C application, and the fellow eye was treated with a placebo. Postoperatively, mitomycin C-treated eyes received artificial tears (3 times daily, tapered in 3 months), whereas the fellow eye was treated with fluorometholone sodium 2% and artificial tears (3 times daily, tapered in 3 months). Main Outcome Measures: Uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), contrast sensitivity, manifest refraction, and biomicroscopy. Contrast sensitivity was determined using the Pelli-Robson chart. Corneal confocal microscopy documented CWH. Results: Mean follow-up was 18 months (range, 12-36). No side effects or toxic effects were documented. At 12-month follow-up examination, UCVAs (logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution) were 0.4±0.48 and 0.5±0.53 (P = .03) in mitomycin C-treated eyes and corticosteroid-treated eyes, respectively. At 1 year, corneal haze developed in 20% of corticosteroid-treated eyes, versus 0% of mitomycin C-treated eyes. At 12, 24, and 36 months, corneal confocal microscopy showed activated keratocytes and extracellular matrix significantly more evident in untreated eyes (Ps = 0.004, 0.024, and 0.046, respectively). Conclusion: Topical intraoperative application of 0.02% mitomycin C can reduce haze formation in highly myopic eyes undergoing PRK.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)208-218
Number of pages11
JournalOphthalmology
Volume112
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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