Mobility Disorders in Stroke, Parkinson Disease, and Multiple Sclerosis: A Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study

NEUROFALL Group, Davide Cattaneo, Elisa Gervasoni, Elisabetta Pupillo, Elisa Bianchi, Irene Aprile, Isabella Imbimbo, Rita Russo, Arianna Cruciani, Johanna Jonsdottir, Michela Agostini, Ettore Beghi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aims of the study were to compare mobility in multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, and stroke, and to quantify the relationship between mobility and participation restrictions. DESIGN: This is a multicenter cross-sectional study. Included were compliant subjects with Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke seen for rehabilitation, with no comorbidities interfering with mobility. Functional scales were applied to each subject to investigate gait speed (10-meter walking test), balance while maintaining body position (Berg Balance Scale), dynamic balance and mobility (Timed Up and Go and Dynamic Gait Index), and participation (Community Integration Questionnaire). RESULTS: Two hundred ninety-nine patients (111 multiple sclerosis, 94 Parkinson disease, and 94 stroke) were enrolled. Stroke had the slowest gait speed (mean gait speed = 0.9 m/sec) compared with Parkinson disease (1.1 m/sec), and multiple sclerosis (1.2 m/sec) (P < 0.001). Multiple sclerosis was more limited than Parkinson disease and stroke in dynamic balance both in the Timed Up and Go Test (multiple sclerosis = 16.7 secs, Parkinson disease = 11.4 secs, stroke = 14.0 secs; P < 0.001) and Dynamic Gait Index (multiple sclerosis = 11.6 points, Parkinson disease = 12.9 points, stroke = 13.6 points; P = 0.03); ability to maintain balance and body position (Berg Balance Scale) was more affected in stroke and Parkinson disease than multiple sclerosis (multiple sclerosis = 42.6 points, Parkinson disease = 39.4 points, stroke = 39.7 points; P = 0.03). Balance disorders were associated with participation restrictions but not gait speed. CONCLUSIONS: Neurological conditions have differing impacts on gait and balance, leading to different levels of participation restriction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-47
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of physical medicine & rehabilitation
Volume99
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Jul 22 2019

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Multiple Sclerosis
Parkinson Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Stroke
Gait
Community Integration
Walking
Comorbidity
Walking Speed

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Mobility Disorders in Stroke, Parkinson Disease, and Multiple Sclerosis : A Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study. / NEUROFALL Group ; Cattaneo, Davide; Gervasoni, Elisa; Pupillo, Elisabetta; Bianchi, Elisa; Aprile, Irene; Imbimbo, Isabella; Russo, Rita; Cruciani, Arianna; Jonsdottir, Johanna; Agostini, Michela; Beghi, Ettore.

In: American journal of physical medicine & rehabilitation, Vol. 99, No. 1, 22.07.2019, p. 41-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The aims of the study were to compare mobility in multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, and stroke, and to quantify the relationship between mobility and participation restrictions. DESIGN: This is a multicenter cross-sectional study. Included were compliant subjects with Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke seen for rehabilitation, with no comorbidities interfering with mobility. Functional scales were applied to each subject to investigate gait speed (10-meter walking test), balance while maintaining body position (Berg Balance Scale), dynamic balance and mobility (Timed Up and Go and Dynamic Gait Index), and participation (Community Integration Questionnaire). RESULTS: Two hundred ninety-nine patients (111 multiple sclerosis, 94 Parkinson disease, and 94 stroke) were enrolled. Stroke had the slowest gait speed (mean gait speed = 0.9 m/sec) compared with Parkinson disease (1.1 m/sec), and multiple sclerosis (1.2 m/sec) (P < 0.001). Multiple sclerosis was more limited than Parkinson disease and stroke in dynamic balance both in the Timed Up and Go Test (multiple sclerosis = 16.7 secs, Parkinson disease = 11.4 secs, stroke = 14.0 secs; P < 0.001) and Dynamic Gait Index (multiple sclerosis = 11.6 points, Parkinson disease = 12.9 points, stroke = 13.6 points; P = 0.03); ability to maintain balance and body position (Berg Balance Scale) was more affected in stroke and Parkinson disease than multiple sclerosis (multiple sclerosis = 42.6 points, Parkinson disease = 39.4 points, stroke = 39.7 points; P = 0.03). Balance disorders were associated with participation restrictions but not gait speed. CONCLUSIONS: Neurological conditions have differing impacts on gait and balance, leading to different levels of participation restriction.",
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