Modeling the relationships between adult attachment patterns and Borderline Personality Disorder

The role of impulsivity and aggressiveness

Andrea Fossati, Judith A. Feeney, Ilaria Carretta, Federica Grazioli, Rita Milesi, Barbara Leonardi, Cesare Maffei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To obtain a better understanding of the associations among Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), adult attachment patterns, impulsivity, and aggressiveness, we tested four competing models of these relationships: a) BPD is associated with the personality traits of impulsivity and aggressiveness, but adult attachment patterns predict neither BPD nor impulsive/aggressive features; b) adult attachment patterns are significant predictors of BPD but not of impulsive/aggressive traits, although these traits correlate with BPD; c) adult attachment patterns are significant predictors of impulsive and aggressive traits, which in turn predict BPD; and d) adult attachment patterns significantly predict both BPD and impulsive/aggressive traits. We assessed 466 consecutively admitted outpatients using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Personality Disorders (V. 2.0), the Attachment Style Questionnaire, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11, and the Aggression Questionnaire. Maximum likelihood structural equation modeling of the covariance matrix showed that model (c) was the best fitting model (x 2(21) = 31.67, p > .05, RMSEA = .023, test of close fit p> .85). This result indicates that adult attachment patterns act indirectly as risk factors for BPD because of their relationships with aggressive/impulsive personality traits.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)520-537
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Social and Clinical Psychology
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2005

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Borderline Personality Disorder
Impulsive Behavior
Personality
Personality Disorders
Aggression
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Outpatients
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Modeling the relationships between adult attachment patterns and Borderline Personality Disorder : The role of impulsivity and aggressiveness. / Fossati, Andrea; Feeney, Judith A.; Carretta, Ilaria; Grazioli, Federica; Milesi, Rita; Leonardi, Barbara; Maffei, Cesare.

In: Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 24, No. 4, 06.2005, p. 520-537.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fossati, Andrea ; Feeney, Judith A. ; Carretta, Ilaria ; Grazioli, Federica ; Milesi, Rita ; Leonardi, Barbara ; Maffei, Cesare. / Modeling the relationships between adult attachment patterns and Borderline Personality Disorder : The role of impulsivity and aggressiveness. In: Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology. 2005 ; Vol. 24, No. 4. pp. 520-537.
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