Modification of gene duplicability during the evolution of protein interaction network

Matteo D'Antonio, Francesca D. Ciccarelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Duplications of genes encoding highly connected and essential proteins are selected against in several species but not in human, where duplicated genes encode highly connected proteins. To understand when and how gene duplicability changed in evolution, we compare gene and network properties in four species (Escherichia coli, yeast, fly, and human) that are representative of the increase in evolutionary complexity, defined as progressive growth in the number of genes, cells, and cell types. We find that the origin and conservation of a gene significantly correlates with the properties of the encoded protein in the protein-protein interaction network. All four species preserve a core of singleton and central hubs that originated early in evolution, are highly conserved, and accomplish basic biological functions. Another group of hubs appeared in metazoans and duplicated in vertebrates, mostly through vertebrate-specific whole genome duplication. Such recent and duplicated hubs are frequently targets of microRNAs and show tissue-selective expression, suggesting that these are alternative mechanisms to control their dosage. Our study shows how networks modified during evolution and contributes to explaining the occurrence of somatic genetic diseases, such as cancer, in terms of network perturbations.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere1002029
JournalPLoS Computational Biology
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2011

Fingerprint

Protein Interaction Maps
Protein Interaction Networks
Genes
Gene
Proteins
protein
gene
Vertebrates
genes
proteins
Duplication
Protein
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Gene Duplication
vertebrates
Gene Regulatory Networks
vertebrate
MicroRNAs
Diptera
protein-protein interactions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Ecology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Modelling and Simulation
  • Computational Theory and Mathematics

Cite this

Modification of gene duplicability during the evolution of protein interaction network. / D'Antonio, Matteo; Ciccarelli, Francesca D.

In: PLoS Computational Biology, Vol. 7, No. 4, e1002029, 04.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

D'Antonio, Matteo ; Ciccarelli, Francesca D. / Modification of gene duplicability during the evolution of protein interaction network. In: PLoS Computational Biology. 2011 ; Vol. 7, No. 4.
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