Modulation of fibrinolytic response to venous occlusion in humans by a combination of low-dose aspirin and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

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Abstract

Aspirin at high but not at low doses reduces the fibrinolytic response to venous occlusion. Inhibition of vascular prostacyclin synthesis could be involved in this effect. Fish oil supplementation may redirect prostanoid metabolism toward an overall "antithrombotic" condition but with controversial effects on prostacyclin formation. In this study we investigated the effect of low-dose aspirin together with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplementation on the fibrinolytic response to venous occlusion. Following a double-blind, randomized, crossover design, six healthy volunteers (three men and three women, 24-37 years old) were given for 29 days 53 g eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids or a corresponding dose of n-6 PUFAs as control; aspirin (40 mg/day) was then added for an additional 14 days. A 2-month washout period was allowed before the crossover. Blood was collected before and after venous stasis on days 0,29, and 43 of each test period. A combination of aspirin with n-3 PUFAs reduced the fibrinolytic response to venous occlusion in all subjects, the mean value of fibrinolytic activity after stasis being 240±40 mm2, a value significantly lower than at baseline (366±51 mm2, mean±SEM, (p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1191-1197
Number of pages7
JournalArteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
Volume12
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - 1992

Keywords

  • Aspirin
  • Fibrinolytic activity
  • Plasminogen activator inhibitor
  • Polyunsaturated fatty acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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