Molecular analysis of a deletion mutant provirus of type I human T-cell lymphotropic virus: Evidence for a double spliced x-lor mRNA

A. Aldovini, A. de Rossi, M. B. Feinberg, F. Wong-Staal, G. Franchini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The genome of the human T-cell leukemia/lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) contains a functional gene denominated x-lor that may be important in HTLV-I transformation of human T cells. To study the role of x-lor and other HTLV-I genes in cellular transformation, we obtained a transformed nonproducer human T-cell line containing a single defective HTLV-I provirus (HTLV-I 55/PL). This 7-kilobase provirus had undergone a deletion involving the entire envelope gene and the nonconserved region. The point of deletion corresponded to the junction of a donor splice site, located between the polymerase gene and the envelope gene (nucleotide 5183), and the acceptor site for the mRNA of the x-lor gene (nucleotide 7302). The juxtaposition of nucleotides 5182 and 7302 brings the initiating methionine codon of the envelope gene immediately 5' to the x-lor region, leaving the DNA sequence in frame for expression of a protein product. This finding suggests that a double splicing mechanism is used to express the x-lor gene, and that the defective provirus 55/PL was generated through the reverse transcription of a partially spliced mRNA. Analysis of the x-lor mRNA of other HTLV-I-transformed cell lines revealed that a double splicing process is commonly used. Furthermore, since 55/PL can be faithfully transmitted and is able to immortalize recipient T cells, we can conclude that the envelope gene is not necessary for in vitro transformation by HTLV-I.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-42
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume83
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1986

Fingerprint

Proviruses
Human T-lymphotropic virus 1
Viruses
T-Lymphocytes
Messenger RNA
Genes
pX Genes
Nucleotides
Transformed Cell Line
RNA Splice Sites
Codon
Methionine
Reverse Transcription
Genome
Cell Line

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Cite this

Molecular analysis of a deletion mutant provirus of type I human T-cell lymphotropic virus : Evidence for a double spliced x-lor mRNA. / Aldovini, A.; de Rossi, A.; Feinberg, M. B.; Wong-Staal, F.; Franchini, G.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 83, No. 1, 1986, p. 38-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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