Molecular analysis of juvenile Huntington disease: The major influence on (CAG)n repeat length is the sex of the affected parent

H. Telenius, H. P H Kremer, J. Theilmann, S. E. Andrew, E. Almqvist, M. Anvret, C. Greenberg, J. Greenberg, G. Lucotte, F. Squitieri, E. Starr, Y. P. Goldberg, M. R. Hayden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Juvenile Huntington disease (HD), characterised by onset of symptoms before the age of 20 with rigidity and intellectual decline, is associated with a predominance of affected fathers. In order to investigate the molecular basis for the observed parental effect, we have analysed the CAG trinucleotide repeat within the HD gene in 42 juvenile onset cases from 34 families. A highly significant correlation was found between the repeat length and age of onset (r= -0.86, p-7) and it was determined that the sex of transmitting parent was the major influence on CAG expansion leading to earlier onset. Neither the size of the parental upper allele, the age of parent at conception of juvenile onset child, nor the grandparental sex conferred a significant effect upon expansion. Affected sib pair analysis of CAG repeat length, however, revealed a high correlation (r=0.91, p-7). Furthermore, analysis of nuclear and extended families showed a familial predisposition to juvenile onset disease. This study demonstrates that the sex of transmitting parent is the major influence on trinucleotide expansion and clinical features in juvenile Huntington disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1535-1540
Number of pages6
JournalHuman Molecular Genetics
Volume2
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1993

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Huntington Disease
Trinucleotide Repeats
Nuclear Family
Age of Onset
Fathers
Alleles
Rigidity
Genes
Gene
Influence
Demonstrate
Family

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Telenius, H., Kremer, H. P. H., Theilmann, J., Andrew, S. E., Almqvist, E., Anvret, M., ... Hayden, M. R. (1993). Molecular analysis of juvenile Huntington disease: The major influence on (CAG)n repeat length is the sex of the affected parent. Human Molecular Genetics, 2(10), 1535-1540.

Molecular analysis of juvenile Huntington disease : The major influence on (CAG)n repeat length is the sex of the affected parent. / Telenius, H.; Kremer, H. P H; Theilmann, J.; Andrew, S. E.; Almqvist, E.; Anvret, M.; Greenberg, C.; Greenberg, J.; Lucotte, G.; Squitieri, F.; Starr, E.; Goldberg, Y. P.; Hayden, M. R.

In: Human Molecular Genetics, Vol. 2, No. 10, 10.1993, p. 1535-1540.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Telenius, H, Kremer, HPH, Theilmann, J, Andrew, SE, Almqvist, E, Anvret, M, Greenberg, C, Greenberg, J, Lucotte, G, Squitieri, F, Starr, E, Goldberg, YP & Hayden, MR 1993, 'Molecular analysis of juvenile Huntington disease: The major influence on (CAG)n repeat length is the sex of the affected parent', Human Molecular Genetics, vol. 2, no. 10, pp. 1535-1540.
Telenius H, Kremer HPH, Theilmann J, Andrew SE, Almqvist E, Anvret M et al. Molecular analysis of juvenile Huntington disease: The major influence on (CAG)n repeat length is the sex of the affected parent. Human Molecular Genetics. 1993 Oct;2(10):1535-1540.
Telenius, H. ; Kremer, H. P H ; Theilmann, J. ; Andrew, S. E. ; Almqvist, E. ; Anvret, M. ; Greenberg, C. ; Greenberg, J. ; Lucotte, G. ; Squitieri, F. ; Starr, E. ; Goldberg, Y. P. ; Hayden, M. R. / Molecular analysis of juvenile Huntington disease : The major influence on (CAG)n repeat length is the sex of the affected parent. In: Human Molecular Genetics. 1993 ; Vol. 2, No. 10. pp. 1535-1540.
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