Molecular and functional characterization of NKG2D, NKp80, and NKG2C triggering NK cell receptors in rhesus and cynomolgus macaques: Monitoring of NK cell function during simian HIV infection

Roberto Biassoni, Manuela Fogli, Claudia Cantoni, Paola Costa, Romana Conte, Gerrit Koopman, Aurelio Cafaro, Barbara Ensoli, Alessandro Moretta, Lorenzo Moretta, Andrea De Maria

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

An involvement of innate immunity and of NK cells during the priming of adaptive immune responses has been recently suggested in normal and disease conditions such as HIV infection and acute myelogenous leukemia. The analysis of NK cell-triggering receptor expression has been so far restricted to only NKp46 and NKp30 in Macaca fascicularis. In this study, we extended the molecular and functional characterization to the various NK cell-triggering receptors using PBMC and to the in vitro-derived NK cell populations by cytofluorometry and by cytolytic activity assays. In addition, RT-PCR strategy, cDNA cloning/sequencing, and transient transfections were used to identify and characterize NKp80, NKG2D, CD94/NKG2C, and CD94/NKG2A in M. fascicularis and Macaca mulatta as well as in the signal transducing polypeptide DNAX-activating protein DAP-10. Both M. fascicularis and M. mulatta NK cells express NKp80, NKG2D, and NKG2C molecules, which displayed a high degree of sequence homology with their human counterpart. Analysis of NK cells in simian HIV-infected M. fascicularis revealed reduced surface expression of selected NK cell-triggering receptors associated with a decreased NK cell function only in some animals. Overall surface density of NK cell-triggering receptors on peripheral blood cells and their triggering function on NK cell populations derived in vitro was not decreased compared with uninfected animals. Thus, triggering NK cell receptor monitoring on macaque NK cells is possible and could provide a valuable tool for assessing NK cell function during experimental infections and for exploring possible differences in immune correlates of protection in humans compared with cynomolgus and rhesus macaques undergoing different vaccination strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5695-5705
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume174
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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