Molecular evidence of the camel strain (G6 genotype) of Echinococcus granulosus in humans from Turkana, Kenya

Adriano Casulli, Eberhard Zeyhle, Enrico Brunetti, Edoardo Pozio, Valeria Meroni, Francesca Genco, Carlo Filice

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37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a zoonotic helminthic disease, which is widely distributed throughout the world. Although G1 is the Echinococcus granulosus genotype most commonly involved in CE in humans, the prevalence of infection with other genotypes, such as G6, may be higher than previously thought. We performed molecular analysis to identify which E. granulosus genotypes are the causative agents of CE in humans in Kenya's Turkana district. During a Hydatid Control Programme in 1993-1994, 71 cyst fluid isolates of E. granulosus were collected during PAIR (puncture, aspiration, injection, re-aspiration) sessions. DNA was amplified for two genes from 59 isolates. Of these, 49 isolates (83%) were identified as G1 and 10 (17%) as G6. This is the highest prevalence of G6 detected in humans of the Old World, and our results suggest that, in highly contaminated environments, G6 might be of greater public health significance than previously believed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-32
Number of pages4
JournalTransactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume104
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2010

Fingerprint

Echinococcus granulosus
Camelus
Kenya
Echinococcosis
Genotype
Cyst Fluid
Paracentesis
Zoonoses
Public Health
Injections
DNA
Infection
Genes

Keywords

  • Camel strain
  • Echinococcus
  • Hydatidosis
  • Kenya
  • Molecular epidemiology
  • Sheep strain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Molecular evidence of the camel strain (G6 genotype) of Echinococcus granulosus in humans from Turkana, Kenya",
abstract = "Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a zoonotic helminthic disease, which is widely distributed throughout the world. Although G1 is the Echinococcus granulosus genotype most commonly involved in CE in humans, the prevalence of infection with other genotypes, such as G6, may be higher than previously thought. We performed molecular analysis to identify which E. granulosus genotypes are the causative agents of CE in humans in Kenya's Turkana district. During a Hydatid Control Programme in 1993-1994, 71 cyst fluid isolates of E. granulosus were collected during PAIR (puncture, aspiration, injection, re-aspiration) sessions. DNA was amplified for two genes from 59 isolates. Of these, 49 isolates (83{\%}) were identified as G1 and 10 (17{\%}) as G6. This is the highest prevalence of G6 detected in humans of the Old World, and our results suggest that, in highly contaminated environments, G6 might be of greater public health significance than previously believed.",
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AU - Casulli, Adriano

AU - Zeyhle, Eberhard

AU - Brunetti, Enrico

AU - Pozio, Edoardo

AU - Meroni, Valeria

AU - Genco, Francesca

AU - Filice, Carlo

PY - 2010/1

Y1 - 2010/1

N2 - Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a zoonotic helminthic disease, which is widely distributed throughout the world. Although G1 is the Echinococcus granulosus genotype most commonly involved in CE in humans, the prevalence of infection with other genotypes, such as G6, may be higher than previously thought. We performed molecular analysis to identify which E. granulosus genotypes are the causative agents of CE in humans in Kenya's Turkana district. During a Hydatid Control Programme in 1993-1994, 71 cyst fluid isolates of E. granulosus were collected during PAIR (puncture, aspiration, injection, re-aspiration) sessions. DNA was amplified for two genes from 59 isolates. Of these, 49 isolates (83%) were identified as G1 and 10 (17%) as G6. This is the highest prevalence of G6 detected in humans of the Old World, and our results suggest that, in highly contaminated environments, G6 might be of greater public health significance than previously believed.

AB - Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a zoonotic helminthic disease, which is widely distributed throughout the world. Although G1 is the Echinococcus granulosus genotype most commonly involved in CE in humans, the prevalence of infection with other genotypes, such as G6, may be higher than previously thought. We performed molecular analysis to identify which E. granulosus genotypes are the causative agents of CE in humans in Kenya's Turkana district. During a Hydatid Control Programme in 1993-1994, 71 cyst fluid isolates of E. granulosus were collected during PAIR (puncture, aspiration, injection, re-aspiration) sessions. DNA was amplified for two genes from 59 isolates. Of these, 49 isolates (83%) were identified as G1 and 10 (17%) as G6. This is the highest prevalence of G6 detected in humans of the Old World, and our results suggest that, in highly contaminated environments, G6 might be of greater public health significance than previously believed.

KW - Camel strain

KW - Echinococcus

KW - Hydatidosis

KW - Kenya

KW - Molecular epidemiology

KW - Sheep strain

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