Molecular mimicry of the antigen receptor signalling motif by transmembrane proteins of the Epstein-Barr virus and the bovine leukaemia virus

Gottfried Alber, Kwang Myong Kim, Peter Weiser, Christa Riesterer, Rita Carsetti, Michael Reth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Many transmembrane proteins of eukaryotic cells have only a short cytoplasmic tail of 10 - 100 amino acids, which has no obvious catalytic function. These tails are thought to be involved either in signal transduction or in the association of transmembrane proteins with the cytoskeleton. We have previously identified, in the cytoplasmic tails of components of B and T lymphocyte antigen receptors, an amino-acid motif that is required for signalling. The same motif is also found in the cytoplasmic tails of two viral proteins: the latent membrane protein, LMP2A, of Epstein Barr virus and the envelope protein, gp30, of bovine leukaemia virus. Interestingly, both viruses can activate infected B lymphocytes to proliferate, as does signalling by the B-cell receptor. Results: In this study, we show that the cytoplasmic tails of the two viral proteins, and the cytoplasmic tail of the B-cell receptor immunoglobulin-α chain, when linked to CD8 in chimeric transmembrane proteins, can transduce signals in B cells. Cross-linking of these chimeric receptors activates B-cell protein tyrosine kinases and results in calcium mobilization. Furthermore, these cytoplasmic sequences are also protein tyrosine kinase substrates and may interact with cytosolic proteins carrying SH2 protein-protein interaction domains. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that viral transmembrane proteins can mimic the antigen-induced stimulation of the B-cell antigen receptor and thus can influence the activation and/or survival of infected B lymphocytes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)333-339
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume3
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 1993

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Bovine Leukemia Virus
molecular mimicry
Molecular Mimicry
Human herpesvirus 4
Bovine leukemia virus
Amino Acid Motifs
Antigen Receptors
transmembrane proteins
Human Herpesvirus 4
Viruses
Viral Tail Proteins
B-lymphocytes
B-Lymphocytes
antigens
receptors
tail
Cells
Lymphocytes
Viral Proteins
viral proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Molecular mimicry of the antigen receptor signalling motif by transmembrane proteins of the Epstein-Barr virus and the bovine leukaemia virus. / Alber, Gottfried; Kim, Kwang Myong; Weiser, Peter; Riesterer, Christa; Carsetti, Rita; Reth, Michael.

In: Current Biology, Vol. 3, No. 6, 01.06.1993, p. 333-339.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alber, Gottfried ; Kim, Kwang Myong ; Weiser, Peter ; Riesterer, Christa ; Carsetti, Rita ; Reth, Michael. / Molecular mimicry of the antigen receptor signalling motif by transmembrane proteins of the Epstein-Barr virus and the bovine leukaemia virus. In: Current Biology. 1993 ; Vol. 3, No. 6. pp. 333-339.
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