Molybdenum(VI) salts convert the xanthine oxidoreductase apoprotein into the active enzyme in mouse L929 fibroblastic cells

F. Falciani, M. Terao, S. Goldwurm, A. Ronchi, A. Gatti, C. Minoia, M. L. Calzi, M. Salmona, G. Cazzaniga, E. Garattini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The mouse L929 fibroblastic cell line presents low, but detectable, levels of the mRNA encoding xanthine oxidoreductase under basal conditions, and it responds to type I and type II interferons by inducing the expression of the transcript. This cell line, however, does not show any detectable amount of xanthine oxidoreductase enzymic activity, either before or after treatment with the cytokines. Molybdenum(VI) salts, in the millimolar range, are capable of activating xanthine oxidoreductase in L929 cells both under basal conditions and after treatment with interferon-α. The increase is observed in mouse L929 as well as in clones derived from it, but not in many other human and mouse cell lines. The induction observed in L929 cells is post-translational in nature and it is insensitive to cycloheximide, indicating that the molybdenum ion converts a pool of inactive xanthine oxidoreductase apoenzyme into its holoenzymic form. When grown in the absence of sodium molybdate, the L929 cell line has undetectable intracellular levels of the molybdenum cofactor, since the cell extracts are unable to complement the nitrate reductase defect of the nit-1 mutant of Neurospora crassa. L929 cells grown in the presence of millimolar concentrations of sodium molybdate, however, become competent to complement the nit-1 defect. L929 cells accumulate molybdenum ion inside the intracellular compartment as efficiently as TEnd cells, a mouse endothelial cell line that expresses xanthine oxidoreductase activity both under basal conditions and after treatment with interferon-γ, suggesting that L929 cells have a defect in one or more of the metabolic steps leading to the synthesis of the molybdenum cofactor.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-77
Number of pages9
JournalBiochemical Journal
Volume298
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

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