Monitoring the water-holding capacity in visually non-irritated skin by plastic occlusion stress test (POST)

E. Berardesca, H. I. Maibach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Skin-surface waterloss (SSWL) and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were studied after a plastic occlusion stress test (POST) in visually non-damaged skin treated with 7% sodium lauryl sulphate for 3 days (open application). After removal of the 24-h plastic occlusion, SSWL and TEWL were recorded continuously for 25 min. SSWL decay curves show significant differences between control and treated areas. The total amount of water trapped within the stratum corneum and released after 1 min is significantly reduced (P <0.01) in the treated site. Higher TEWL (P <0.02) in visually non-irritated skin is noticeable in the terminal part of the curve reflecting the damage of the water barrier in irritated skin. The data suggest that clinically normal skin exposed to subliminal irritant stimuli is less capable of storing water within the stratum corneum resulting in decreased hydration. The POST appears to be a simple and reliable tool to investigate non-visible but biologically relevant changes in stratum corneum function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)107-110
Number of pages4
JournalClinical and Experimental Dermatology
Volume15
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1990

Fingerprint

Exercise Test
Plastics
Skin
Water
Cornea
Irritants
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Monitoring the water-holding capacity in visually non-irritated skin by plastic occlusion stress test (POST). / Berardesca, E.; Maibach, H. I.

In: Clinical and Experimental Dermatology, Vol. 15, No. 2, 1990, p. 107-110.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e720c7ff346f45e9814f30c656188914,
title = "Monitoring the water-holding capacity in visually non-irritated skin by plastic occlusion stress test (POST)",
abstract = "Skin-surface waterloss (SSWL) and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were studied after a plastic occlusion stress test (POST) in visually non-damaged skin treated with 7{\%} sodium lauryl sulphate for 3 days (open application). After removal of the 24-h plastic occlusion, SSWL and TEWL were recorded continuously for 25 min. SSWL decay curves show significant differences between control and treated areas. The total amount of water trapped within the stratum corneum and released after 1 min is significantly reduced (P <0.01) in the treated site. Higher TEWL (P <0.02) in visually non-irritated skin is noticeable in the terminal part of the curve reflecting the damage of the water barrier in irritated skin. The data suggest that clinically normal skin exposed to subliminal irritant stimuli is less capable of storing water within the stratum corneum resulting in decreased hydration. The POST appears to be a simple and reliable tool to investigate non-visible but biologically relevant changes in stratum corneum function.",
author = "E. Berardesca and Maibach, {H. I.}",
year = "1990",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "107--110",
journal = "Clinical and Experimental Dermatology",
issn = "0307-6938",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Monitoring the water-holding capacity in visually non-irritated skin by plastic occlusion stress test (POST)

AU - Berardesca, E.

AU - Maibach, H. I.

PY - 1990

Y1 - 1990

N2 - Skin-surface waterloss (SSWL) and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were studied after a plastic occlusion stress test (POST) in visually non-damaged skin treated with 7% sodium lauryl sulphate for 3 days (open application). After removal of the 24-h plastic occlusion, SSWL and TEWL were recorded continuously for 25 min. SSWL decay curves show significant differences between control and treated areas. The total amount of water trapped within the stratum corneum and released after 1 min is significantly reduced (P <0.01) in the treated site. Higher TEWL (P <0.02) in visually non-irritated skin is noticeable in the terminal part of the curve reflecting the damage of the water barrier in irritated skin. The data suggest that clinically normal skin exposed to subliminal irritant stimuli is less capable of storing water within the stratum corneum resulting in decreased hydration. The POST appears to be a simple and reliable tool to investigate non-visible but biologically relevant changes in stratum corneum function.

AB - Skin-surface waterloss (SSWL) and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were studied after a plastic occlusion stress test (POST) in visually non-damaged skin treated with 7% sodium lauryl sulphate for 3 days (open application). After removal of the 24-h plastic occlusion, SSWL and TEWL were recorded continuously for 25 min. SSWL decay curves show significant differences between control and treated areas. The total amount of water trapped within the stratum corneum and released after 1 min is significantly reduced (P <0.01) in the treated site. Higher TEWL (P <0.02) in visually non-irritated skin is noticeable in the terminal part of the curve reflecting the damage of the water barrier in irritated skin. The data suggest that clinically normal skin exposed to subliminal irritant stimuli is less capable of storing water within the stratum corneum resulting in decreased hydration. The POST appears to be a simple and reliable tool to investigate non-visible but biologically relevant changes in stratum corneum function.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025017413&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025017413&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 2347099

AN - SCOPUS:0025017413

VL - 15

SP - 107

EP - 110

JO - Clinical and Experimental Dermatology

JF - Clinical and Experimental Dermatology

SN - 0307-6938

IS - 2

ER -