Motherese in Interaction: At the Cross-Road of Emotion and Cognition? (A Systematic Review)

Catherine Saint-Georges, Mohamed Chetouani, Raquel Cassel, Fabio Apicella, Ammar Mahdhaoui, Filippo Muratori, Marie Christine Laznik, David Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Various aspects of motherese also known as infant-directed speech (IDS) have been studied for many years. As it is a widespread phenomenon, it is suspected to play some important roles in infant development. Therefore, our purpose was to provide an update of the evidence accumulated by reviewing all of the empirical or experimental studies that have been published since 1966 on IDS driving factors and impacts. Two databases were screened and 144 relevant studies were retained. General linguistic and prosodic characteristics of IDS were found in a variety of languages, and IDS was not restricted to mothers. IDS varied with factors associated with the caregiver (e.g., cultural, psychological and physiological) and the infant (e.g., reactivity and interactive feedback). IDS promoted infants' affect, attention and language learning. Cognitive aspects of IDS have been widely studied whereas affective ones still need to be developed. However, during interactions, the following two observations were notable: (1) IDS prosody reflects emotional charges and meets infants' preferences, and (2) mother-infant contingency and synchrony are crucial for IDS production and prolongation. Thus, IDS is part of an interactive loop that may play an important role in infants' cognitive and social development.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere78103
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 18 2013

Fingerprint

systematic review
emotions
cognition
Cognition
Emotions
animal technicians
infant development
Language
Mothers
Linguistics
learning
Child Development
Feedback
Caregivers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Motherese in Interaction : At the Cross-Road of Emotion and Cognition? (A Systematic Review). / Saint-Georges, Catherine; Chetouani, Mohamed; Cassel, Raquel; Apicella, Fabio; Mahdhaoui, Ammar; Muratori, Filippo; Laznik, Marie Christine; Cohen, David.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 10, e78103, 18.10.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saint-Georges, C, Chetouani, M, Cassel, R, Apicella, F, Mahdhaoui, A, Muratori, F, Laznik, MC & Cohen, D 2013, 'Motherese in Interaction: At the Cross-Road of Emotion and Cognition? (A Systematic Review)', PLoS One, vol. 8, no. 10, e78103. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0078103
Saint-Georges, Catherine ; Chetouani, Mohamed ; Cassel, Raquel ; Apicella, Fabio ; Mahdhaoui, Ammar ; Muratori, Filippo ; Laznik, Marie Christine ; Cohen, David. / Motherese in Interaction : At the Cross-Road of Emotion and Cognition? (A Systematic Review). In: PLoS One. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 10.
@article{ca3b1e15faee4f81a105b46744e7ee8e,
title = "Motherese in Interaction: At the Cross-Road of Emotion and Cognition? (A Systematic Review)",
abstract = "Various aspects of motherese also known as infant-directed speech (IDS) have been studied for many years. As it is a widespread phenomenon, it is suspected to play some important roles in infant development. Therefore, our purpose was to provide an update of the evidence accumulated by reviewing all of the empirical or experimental studies that have been published since 1966 on IDS driving factors and impacts. Two databases were screened and 144 relevant studies were retained. General linguistic and prosodic characteristics of IDS were found in a variety of languages, and IDS was not restricted to mothers. IDS varied with factors associated with the caregiver (e.g., cultural, psychological and physiological) and the infant (e.g., reactivity and interactive feedback). IDS promoted infants' affect, attention and language learning. Cognitive aspects of IDS have been widely studied whereas affective ones still need to be developed. However, during interactions, the following two observations were notable: (1) IDS prosody reflects emotional charges and meets infants' preferences, and (2) mother-infant contingency and synchrony are crucial for IDS production and prolongation. Thus, IDS is part of an interactive loop that may play an important role in infants' cognitive and social development.",
author = "Catherine Saint-Georges and Mohamed Chetouani and Raquel Cassel and Fabio Apicella and Ammar Mahdhaoui and Filippo Muratori and Laznik, {Marie Christine} and David Cohen",
year = "2013",
month = "10",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0078103",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Motherese in Interaction

T2 - At the Cross-Road of Emotion and Cognition? (A Systematic Review)

AU - Saint-Georges, Catherine

AU - Chetouani, Mohamed

AU - Cassel, Raquel

AU - Apicella, Fabio

AU - Mahdhaoui, Ammar

AU - Muratori, Filippo

AU - Laznik, Marie Christine

AU - Cohen, David

PY - 2013/10/18

Y1 - 2013/10/18

N2 - Various aspects of motherese also known as infant-directed speech (IDS) have been studied for many years. As it is a widespread phenomenon, it is suspected to play some important roles in infant development. Therefore, our purpose was to provide an update of the evidence accumulated by reviewing all of the empirical or experimental studies that have been published since 1966 on IDS driving factors and impacts. Two databases were screened and 144 relevant studies were retained. General linguistic and prosodic characteristics of IDS were found in a variety of languages, and IDS was not restricted to mothers. IDS varied with factors associated with the caregiver (e.g., cultural, psychological and physiological) and the infant (e.g., reactivity and interactive feedback). IDS promoted infants' affect, attention and language learning. Cognitive aspects of IDS have been widely studied whereas affective ones still need to be developed. However, during interactions, the following two observations were notable: (1) IDS prosody reflects emotional charges and meets infants' preferences, and (2) mother-infant contingency and synchrony are crucial for IDS production and prolongation. Thus, IDS is part of an interactive loop that may play an important role in infants' cognitive and social development.

AB - Various aspects of motherese also known as infant-directed speech (IDS) have been studied for many years. As it is a widespread phenomenon, it is suspected to play some important roles in infant development. Therefore, our purpose was to provide an update of the evidence accumulated by reviewing all of the empirical or experimental studies that have been published since 1966 on IDS driving factors and impacts. Two databases were screened and 144 relevant studies were retained. General linguistic and prosodic characteristics of IDS were found in a variety of languages, and IDS was not restricted to mothers. IDS varied with factors associated with the caregiver (e.g., cultural, psychological and physiological) and the infant (e.g., reactivity and interactive feedback). IDS promoted infants' affect, attention and language learning. Cognitive aspects of IDS have been widely studied whereas affective ones still need to be developed. However, during interactions, the following two observations were notable: (1) IDS prosody reflects emotional charges and meets infants' preferences, and (2) mother-infant contingency and synchrony are crucial for IDS production and prolongation. Thus, IDS is part of an interactive loop that may play an important role in infants' cognitive and social development.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84885819560&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84885819560&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0078103

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0078103

M3 - Article

C2 - 24205112

AN - SCOPUS:84885819560

VL - 8

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 10

M1 - e78103

ER -