Motor neuron disease in the United States, 1971 and 1973–1978: Patterns of mortality and ssociated conditions at the time of death

Maurizio Leone, Vijay Chandra, Bruce S. Schoenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Mortality rates for deaths “due to” and “with” motor neuron disease are presented for the first time. Age-specific mortality rates increase with age until 70 to 74 years and then decline. There appear to be no major differences by race in the age-adjusted mortality rates, but these rates are higher for males both white and nonwhite. A case-control study of all deaths with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was conducted for deaths due to ALS in the year 1971. Conditions associated with ALS at the time of death include pneumonia and bronchopneumonia, symptoms referable to respiratory system, superficial injury to shoulder and upper arm, essential benign hypertension, chronic skin ulcer, and malnutrition. No association was found between ALS and malignancies, Parkinson's disease, or dementia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1339-1343
Number of pages5
JournalNeurology
Volume37
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - 1987

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

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