Motor timing and motor sequencing contribute differently to the preparation for voluntary movement

Marta Bortoletto, Ross Cunnington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two crucial processes preceding voluntary action are determining the time for movement initiation and planning of the specific sequence of motor output. In this study we aimed to differentiate the neural activity related to motor timing and motor sequencing and to examine over what time periods they contribute to premovement activity during the readiness for voluntary action. Eighteen participants performed self-initiated voluntary finger movements in a readiness potential paradigm, both during EEG measurement and during fMRI. The finger movement task involved three conditions: (1) simple repetitive sequences; (2) increased demand on the sequencing of movement order; and (3) increased demand on the timing of movement initiation. Functional MRI and 64 channels EEG were conducted in two separate sessions. Motor timing and motor sequencing were found to involve different neural processes occurring at different times prior to movement initiation. Motor timing involved greater activation in lateral prefrontal regions over the earliest part of premovement activity, from 1200 ms before movement onset. Motor sequencing involved greater activation of dorsal premotor and parietal areas and was reflected in central and parietal scalp regions only over the later part of premovement activity, within 600 ms of movement onset. We suggest that different neural processes contribute to different aspects of the intended action over different time periods during the preparation for movement, and it is the coordinated activity of these multiple regions that is represented in premovement activity during the readiness for voluntary action.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3338-3348
Number of pages11
JournalNeuroImage
Volume49
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 15 2010

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Keywords

  • Action preparation
  • fMRI
  • Motor sequencing
  • Motor timing
  • Movement-related potentials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Neurology

Cite this

Motor timing and motor sequencing contribute differently to the preparation for voluntary movement. / Bortoletto, Marta; Cunnington, Ross.

In: NeuroImage, Vol. 49, No. 4, 15.02.2010, p. 3338-3348.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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