MRI-clinical correlations in the primary progressive course of MS: New insights into the disease pathophysiology from the application of magnetization transfer, diffusion tensor, and functional MRI

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12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) experience a progressive disease course from onset, the burden and activity of lesions on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the brain are lower than in all other main clinical phenotypes of MS. This review outlines the major contributions given by magnetization transfer MRI, diffusion tensor MRI and functional MRI to the understanding of the pathophysiology of PPMS and provides evidence that, at least, three factors might explain this clinical/MRI discrepancy: (a) the presence of a diffuse tissue damage at a microscopic level; (b) a prevalent involvement of the cervical cord, and (c) an impairment of the adaptive capacity of the cortex to limit the functional consequences of subcortical structural damage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)157-164
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the Neurological Sciences
Volume206
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 15 2003

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Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis
Phenotype
Brain

Keywords

  • Diffusion tensor
  • Functional magnetic resonance imaging
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Magnetization transfer
  • Primary progressive multiple sclerosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ageing
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

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